agent

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Agent

A party appointed to act on behalf of a principal entity or person. In context of project financing, refers to the bank in charge of administering the project financing.

Agent

A person who acts on behalf of an organization or another person. Agents have a fiduciary responsibility to act in the best interests of the principal. Common examples of agents include brokers and attorneys. See also: Agency theory, Agency problem, Agency costs.

agent

An individual or organization that acts on behalf of and is subject to the control of another party. For example, in executing an order to buy or sell a security, a broker is acting as a customer's agent.

Agent.

An agent is a person who acts on behalf of another person or institution in a transaction. For example, when you direct your stockbroker to buy or sell shares in your account, he or she is acting as your agent in the trade.

Agents work for either a set fee or a commission based on the size of the transaction and the type of product, or sometimes a combination of fee and commission.

Depending on the work a particular agent does, he or she may need to be certified, licensed, or registered by industry bodies or government regulators. For instance, insurance agents must be licensed in the state where they do business, and stockbrokers must pass licensing exams and be registered with NASD.

In a real estate transaction, a real estate agent represents the seller. That person may also be called a real estate broker or a Realtor if he or she is a member of the National Association of Realtors. A buyer may be represented by a buyer's agent.

agent

a person or company employed by another person or company (called the PRINCIPAL) for the purpose of arranging CONTRACTS between the principal and third parties. An agent generally has authority to act within broad limits in conducting business on behalf of his or her principal and has a basic duty to carry out the tasks involved with due skill and diligence.

An agent or broker acts as an intermediary in bringing together buyers and sellers of a good or service, receiving a flat or sliding scale commission or fee related to the nature and comprehensiveness of the work undertaken and/or value of the transaction involved. Agents and agencies are encountered in one way or another in most economic activities and play an important role in the smooth functioning of the market mechanism. A stockbroker, for example, acts on behalf of clients wishing to buy and sell financial securities; an estate agent acts as an intermediary between buyers and sellers of houses, offices, etc.; while an insurance broker negotiates insurance cover on behalf of clients with an insurance company. A recruitment agency performs the services of advertising for, interviewing and selecting employees on behalf of a company. In addition to the role of agents as market intermediaries, organizational theorists have paid particular attention to the internal relationship between the employees (‘agents’) and owners (‘principals’) of a company See PRINCIPAL-AGENT THEORY.

agent

a person or company employed by another person or company (called the principal) for the purpose of arranging CONTRACTS between the principal and third parties. An agent thus acts as an intermediary in bringing together buyers and sellers of a good or service, receiving a flat or sliding-scale commission, brokerage or fee related to the nature and comprehensiveness of the work undertaken and/or value of the transaction involved. Agents and agencies are encountered in one way or another in most economic activities and play an important role in the smooth functioning of the market mechanism. See PRINCIPAL-AGENT THEORY for discussion of ownership and control issues as they affect the running of companies. See ESTATE AGENT, INSURANCE BROKER, STOCKBROKER, DIVORCE OF OWNERSHIP FROM CONTROL.

agent

One who acts on behalf of a principal in an agency relationship. See agency for an extended discussion.

References in periodicals archive ?
Incorporating a dimension that is both structural and agential, it also sheds light on the limits of hegemonic projects, their transformation and development of new ones.
Effectiveness as an agent (5) requires a sense of oneself as an agent, or at the very least, a belief that one's agential capacities are not totally undermined by external forces.
This doubt must also be accompanied by effective strategizing that takes seriously questions of class as the basis of cultural forms that create the conditions for consent, the importance of agential action of organic intellectuals, and also the unpredictable but conceivable tendencies of history to materialize.
In "Vibrancy of Childhood Things: Power, Philosophy, and Political Ecology of Matter," Tesar and Arndt (2016) theorize current materialist perspectives in early childhood through the agential power of "thing-matter-energy-child assemblages" (p.
Diffraction disturbs the idea of linear or static connections, and requires "a cutting together-apart" of relations, "where cuts do violence but also open up and rework the agential conditions of possibility" (Dolphijn & van der Tuin 2012).
69) writes: "With her onto-epistemological framework, Karen Barad highlights the multiple relations between matter (as an agential component), research practices, concepts, meaning making, and representations of knowledge in constituting phenomena." Barad (2007, p.
Such research demonstrates a potential for writing agential actors back into the narratives and analysis of wide-scale political, economic and social change.
Therefore, while a few women first attributed work success (or failure) to their own agential choices, implicit and explicit in their narratives were a range of social relationships that positively and negatively affected their autonomy.
Excepting the most talented and successful individuals, most of us would probably find our agential reserves tapped fairly quickly if our own past and future were all that was involved in the process of hope, and indeed, this seems to be what has happened to many working on issues surrounding climate change.
This contemporary "renaissance of matter," as Iovino terms it, "is conveyed by concepts such as 'agential realism,' 'vital materialism,' 'trans-corporeality,' 'intra-action,' 'post-humanist performativity,' [and] 'material ecocriticism." She cites such thinkers as Karen Barad, Bruno Latour, Andrew Pickering, Judith Butler, Donna Haraway, Stacy Alaimo, and David Abram, among others.
The reason for this is that these interpretations fail to employ a perception of the child concomitant with their reality: agential, rights-bearing children.