Age Discrimination

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Age Discrimination

The practice in which a company or other organization fires, refuses to hire, limits the benefits of or otherwise maltreats a worker of a certain age. For example, an employer may refuse to hire an otherwise qualified applicant for a position because he/she regards the applicant as too old to learn new skills. Likewise, the employer may refuse to hire a younger worker without regard for the worker's qualifications, because he/she believes young people cannot take directions. While legislation in the United States and elsewhere protects older workers from age discrimination, these laws do not necessarily protect younger employees. See also: Age Discrimination in Employment Act.
References in periodicals archive ?
Former Crimewatch presenter Nick Ross said, during an Edinburgh TV festival session on ageism in the media: "Like it or not TV is a lookism medium.
And she said she believed a senior executive had attempted to persuade programme makers not to include a photograph of her in a discussion about ageism in the media in BBC1's Sunday Morning Live on September 2.
Like Smith, several interviewees resist internalized ageism, and their comments are a welcome rebel from the many body dissatisfactions expressed by others.
The BBC was accused of ageism in 2007 when they axed Moira Stewart as a TV newsreader after 34 years.
As more mature workers are pushed into the recruitment arena by the reassessment of welfare-to-work benefits, hundreds of thousands of them will risk coming up against the invisible wall of ageism.
Will these actresses, and the hordes of young lesbians mimicking their personas, be immune to the sexism that breeds ageism in the mainstream?
From the language used in a job advert to the attitude of the interviewer, ageism lurks in every stage of recruitment.
This paper explores whether service learning, the benefits of which are well established in the literature, can also help to reduce ageism.
Similarly, target organizations are accused of all sorts of ``isms'' -- racism, sexism, ageism, etc.
Older people talk about ageism as an evil and they seem to welcome the proposed discrimination legislation.
FIRMS are to face new rules that will outlaw ageism in the workplace.
At that point, the societal issues of multi-culturalism, racism, ageism, health-care and human sexuality had not penetrated our theology, much less our consciousness.