Age Discrimination

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Age Discrimination

The practice in which a company or other organization fires, refuses to hire, limits the benefits of or otherwise maltreats a worker of a certain age. For example, an employer may refuse to hire an otherwise qualified applicant for a position because he/she regards the applicant as too old to learn new skills. Likewise, the employer may refuse to hire a younger worker without regard for the worker's qualifications, because he/she believes young people cannot take directions. While legislation in the United States and elsewhere protects older workers from age discrimination, these laws do not necessarily protect younger employees. See also: Age Discrimination in Employment Act.
References in periodicals archive ?
The studies assessed three types of interventions intended to tackle ageism, including contact between generations, education, and a combination of both.
This is why we're calling for action from the governments in Cardiff Bay and Westminster to tackle ageism and its causes.
It's time to make ageism a thing of the past, so let's help to make Wales an age- friendly country.
Strongly agreeing with this year's theme - 'Take a Stand against Ageism', Osotimehin said UNFPA believes that reducing lifelong inequalities and embracing the contributions of older people offer tremendous prospects for development.
And ageism can have some nasty intersections with ableism.
Miriam's legal battle with her former employer made headlines after she lifted the lid on ageism and victimisation at the beeb.
Two outstanding books on ageism published in the 1980s, Look Me in the Eye (1984), by Barbara MacDonald and Cynthia Rich, and Over the Hill (1988), by Baba Copper, opened doors that few feminist walked through.
This week an employment tribunal agreed with her and found the Beeb guilty of ageism.
SELINA Scott is returning to the BBC next week - six months after accusing the corporation of ageism.
MORE older workers will face an "invisible wall of ageism" when they look for a job as the Government plans to reform benefits, it is being claimed.
This is now an historic opportunity to get ageism outlawed.
You'll find a celebrity gossip blog saying Sharon Stone "looks pretty good for being 120 years old." That kind of talk hurts, as demonstrated by Kim Cattrall crying about ageism in her speech at the Golden Globes.