Affinities


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Affinities

In the philosophy of Max Weber, the relationship between Protestant culture and capitalism. According to Weber, affinities exist between Protestantism and capitalism because the former provides a cultural framework for the latter to grow. This is why, in Weber's estimation, Protestant regions like Germany and Britain prospered more economically in the 19th century than Catholic areas like Ireland or Italy.
References in periodicals archive ?
Affinities rely on their strong brand identities in order to cross-sell insurance to existing customers, and use incentives such as discounts and loyalty scheme rewards to do so.
The Affinities explores the complex social connections that determine our lives.
That's because certain groups have stronger connections or affinities, which present opportunities, said David Brennan, vice president of MetLife's Association and Affinity Group Business.
First, because 'from a circle of friends to the choice of a romantic partner, social relations are not simply guided by affinities, they arise from social determinants'.
To search for endogenous estrogens that may have preferential binding affinity for human estrogen receptor (ER) alpha or beta subtype and also to gain insights into the structural determinants favoring differential subtype binding, we studied the binding affinities of 74 natural or synthetic estrogens, including more than 50 steroidal analogs of estradiol-17beta (E2) and estrone (E1) for human ER alpha and ER beta.
KENILWORTH-based Football Affinities Club has clinched a deal with Bank of Scotland Premier League club Aberdeen to offer fans savings on their utility bills.
The Football Affinities Club, which is based in Kenilworth, is now in negotiations with teams based in the Birmingham area.