adjunction


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adjunction

Adding something to property in such a manner that it loses its independent identity.

Example: Personal property consisting of boards and nails will become part of the real estate by adjunction when they are used to build an addition to a house.

References in periodicals archive ?
The case of monoids and groups now suggests the following general question: given an adjunction, admissible with respect to regular epimorphisms, between a category with "weak" algebraic properties and a reflective subcategory with "strong" properties, like a protomodular one, such that the big category is S-protomodular with respect to the class S of split epimorphic trivial extensions, is it always the case that normal extensions are reflective amongst regular epimorphisms?
The adjunction analysis proposed below is consistent with analyses proposed for English sentences such as 'I thought for a very long time that somebody would come' where the clause 'that somebody would come is extraposed to the right (Collins, p.
Moreover, as a consequence of the lack of adjunction property, other properties are also lost.
Based on the Lagrange multiplier adjunction, incorporating these forces into the original stiffness equations (as loads), and transferring it to the left hand side by appending it to the vector of unknowns, the multiplier-augmented system can be obtained as follows:
Jordens' research has an obvious generativist orientation, even though showing a certain onset neutrality regarding the "minimalist/maximalist debate", because the use of notions such as functional category, adjunction or AUX, as basic elements of the syntactic analysis, does not force this researcher to take sides in this question.
Certain mixtures covered with open granularity will not have the desired Mechanical resistance, because of the cohesion and adhesiveness obtained with bitumen; this is why, solutions to these disadvantages are sought in the modification by polymers' adjunction.
As initial data, the system of equilibrium equations along the line of shell adjunction to the contour was investigated (Fig 2 a, b) [13, 14].
To be able to capture these within-group differences, future studies need to use more detailed rural classifications, such as the Urban-Rural Continuum Code that considers a town's population size and adjunction to a metropolitan city (Butler & Beale, 1994).
This distribution of negative markers is expected under the standard assumption that why is a phrasal adverb (an XP), and if only XPs can adjoin to XPs (the directionality of adjunction perhaps varying across languages, a point I will abstract away from here):
Thus, in English low adjunction seems to be preferred, whereas in languages like Spanish of French it is high adjunction that predominates, that is, a preference for the more distant NP (NP1).
14) At this point, the medical regimen varies, with continuation of medical treatment if no clinical deterioration occurs, adjunction of a new antituberculous drug, addition or increased dose of corticosteroids, or surgical intervention.