adjunction

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adjunction

Adding something to property in such a manner that it loses its independent identity.

Example: Personal property consisting of boards and nails will become part of the real estate by adjunction when they are used to build an addition to a house.

References in periodicals archive ?
But adjuncts say the college is making that difficult by sending emails that oppose unionization and by seeking a religious exemption to the union-forming process overseen by the National Labor Relations Board.
Readers interested in a detailed salary analysis can refer to the Adjunct Project website (http:// adjunct.
However, colleges should look to these corporations and minority-owned businesses, not as a source of potential students, but to identity potential adjunct faculty.
The unionization efforts of adjuncts will help aid this trend because as adjuncts become more expensive, to the extent that the unionization is successful, the institutions will begin to think more about the notion of the benefits of full-time instructional faculty who are not on tenure tracks, rather than adjuncts," Ehrenberg concluded.
By serving on these boards, you can make positive contributions to the school, improve your status as a potential adjunct, and become a valuable representative of your company for recruiting and other purposes.
Ginsberg, who wasn't talking specifically about Arkansas schools, said universities have slashed instructional costs by hiring adjunct facility members while administrative costs have skyrocketed.
In Equality for Contingent Faculty: Overcoming the Two-Tier System, Keith Hoeller, an adjunct at Green River Community College in Auburn, Wash.
The plight of adjunct faculty garnered international attention upon the death of Margaret Mary Vojtko, a Duquesne adjunct faculty member who passed away shortly after being fired by the administration, following 25 years of loyal service to her students.
In spite of the high levels of reliance on adjunct faculty, it is disconcerting to see the lack of research literamre available to gauge the efficacy and promote the improvement of this resource.
Adjunct employment can be very attractive to qualified individuals.
Kip Lornell, an adjunct music professor at George Washington University in the District of Columbia, has been teaching students for 25 years and is the author of 13 books on American music.