Address

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Related to addressers: recipient, addressor

Address

1. The physical place where a person or company resides or does business. Most places are on a road of some kind; each building on a road has an individual number so a person or company can receive mail at the address.

2. The place where a person or company receives mail. For example, one's mailing address may be a box at the post office. One can retrieve mail there.

3. A location in the World Wide Web where one can find a website. It is usually followed by a suffix such as .com, .org, or .net. For example, the address for TheFreeDictionary is www.TheFreeDictionary.com.
References in periodicals archive ?
As commented earlier, the ultimate intention of this article is to conduct a linguistic analysis of Neocolonial Cuban periodicals (1930-1959), which would indicate a joint communicative intentionality of both addresser and addressee, and serve as a lens reflecting society diachronically (Vazquez-Amador, 2015: 1).
Contrary to what happened in ostensive communication, the addresser does not aspire to make his informative intention mutually manifest to himself and the receiver; that is to say, the sender of the message "does not publicise his informative intention" (Tanaka (1999[1994]): 41).
So, working with the archive means a constant exposure to germs, mold, dust and mites and to protect yourself you have to wear a mask and surgical gloves--the researchers and the addressers have to wear them also.
The addressers further added the people of different faiths could be brought closer to help reduce extremism and hatred among people of the world.
It may be a poetic or non-poetic textual wholeness (or text) expressing the pleasure or enjoyment (or depending on the genre, displeasure and alienation) which addressers get from creating social effects through language.
An analysis of discourse traditionally has been primarily a linguistic endeavor, and the tern has come to be used to cover a variety of activities relating to how humans use language to communicate and, "in particular, how addressers construct linguistic messages for addressees and how addressees work on linguistic messages in order to interpret them.