Address

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Address

1. The physical place where a person or company resides or does business. Most places are on a road of some kind; each building on a road has an individual number so a person or company can receive mail at the address.

2. The place where a person or company receives mail. For example, one's mailing address may be a box at the post office. One can retrieve mail there.

3. A location in the World Wide Web where one can find a website. It is usually followed by a suffix such as .com, .org, or .net. For example, the address for TheFreeDictionary is www.TheFreeDictionary.com.
References in periodicals archive ?
The adverb attempts to persuade the addressee to carry out an action that is presented as reporting benefit to him.
Lower degrees of authority of the speaker over the addressee motivate an interpretation of a speech act which is closer to a request than to an order.
This quality (as established in the second paragraph) continues to hold in the third paragraph, namely that Pip is narrating within a communicative situation where relevant matters that facilitate mutual understanding do not need explicit comment because what is known to, or understood by, the speaker is also already available to the addressee.
The addressee is enjoined, directed, to preserve "the sacred flame" of "early friendship," those "affinities" that have their "strongest part / In youth" (ll.
I]t must be recognised that this document instituting the proceedings, had not been delivered to its addressee before May 16, 2007 at 1400 hours, [the] condition imposed by the President of the Paris District Court upon his giving leave to summon.
5) I recommend a reading of Philemon that diverts the primary focus from the request of Paul directed to the addressees, toward the act of requesting by Paul.
Arguers may design their argumentation in a way that pressures reluctant addressees to consider matters that otherwise they might disregard (Kauffeld, "Persuasive" 86).
Following the principles of Relevance Theory it could be argued that the use of a language not expected by the audience would force the addressee to make an extra processing effort, which would go against the principles established by this theory.
One is the so-called "addressee-directed" illocutionary act, aimed at hearers in their roles as addressees, including all the traditional classes of illocutionary acts.
In his projection of the beloved's future, Ronsard's addressee, not her admirer's hesitation, holds the blame for rejecting the possibility of romance.
Sir, the item here enclosed is returned to sender because refused by the rightful addressee.