activity


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Activity

1. An act that requires use of resources or time. In Program Evaluation and Review Technique (PERT), an activity is represented by an arrow on a PERT chart.

2. In investing, the amount of a security's relative trading volume; that is, the amount of money flowing into and out of a security in trading. A high amount of activity means that many shares of the security are being bought and sold at a high rate, while a low level of activity indicates the opposite.

activity

The amount of relative trading volume in a security.
References in periodicals archive ?
We must examine the policies on physical activity, such as those that make Americans so reliant on the automobile for transportation, which in turn likely contributes to declining physical activity in the population.
Suspicious Activity Reports: These reports are the responsibility of any MSB that knows, suspects or has reason to suspect that a transaction (or pattern of transactions) is suspicious, and involves a certain dollar amount.
District 7--Chicago: The economy continued to grow moderately in late February and March, although activity lagged in Michigan.
In other words, QPAI equals the taxpayer's DPGR minus the COGS allocable to those gross receipts minus all other deductions that can be directly or indirectly allocated to that production activity.
The rest of the schemes are also frameworks which primarily determine our understanding of science and how to carry out scientific activity. Epistemology resembles anatomy in that if there is one human anatomy then there is only one human epistemology.
OBJECTIVES: Upon completion of this review activity, you will have:
Chair aerobics can be scheduled in an activity or day room in your facility.
* Most older adults don't get enough physical activity.
"With facilities now looking to get reimbursement any way they can, activities and quality of life are getting the short end of the stick," cautions certified activity consultant Catherine R.
Brown (1983) and Brown, Gordon, and Ragnarsson (1987) compared the activity choices of well-matched samples of people with SCI (N=22) and those without a disability (N=22).
As with all activities, the decision to engage in a particular activity and level of individual accomplishment should be couched by a "challenge by choice" philosophy.
But newspapers surely did not chronicle the vast bulk of private leisure, and the chances of such an activity being reported probably declined over time.(36) Nevertheless, these accounts allow us to track how reports of newsworthy events changed.

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