Active

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Active

A market in which there is frequent trading.

Active

1. Describing a security that is traded with relative frequency. Many investors look to active securities because they can be traded, even in rather large quantities, without affecting the price. Active securities usually have a low bid-ask spread.

2. Describing a market or exchange with a high trading volume.

active

Of or relating to a security in which there is a great deal of trading. Active securities appeal to many investors because they usually can be traded without affecting the price. In over-the-counter trading, an active security usually has a smaller spread between the bid and ask price. See also most-active stocks.
References in periodicals archive ?
6, the channel with the best high-quality activeness. On the other hand, the sniffer sensor with Fixed Channel Allocation algorithms on the worst high-quality active channel works worst, only 4.2% of the best one.
In the sections that follow, we specifically address these issues by developing an empirical typology of companies based on managerial perceptions of customers' environmental activeness and deterrents and linking them to environmental strategies, motives and results.
objectives and reach them." Dynamism and Passive, low energy; "I prefer activities activeness incapable of keeping such as reading or up any activity for meditation to doing long.
Kari Ellingson, University of Utah, Division of Student Affairs Table 1 Correlations Among Variables for All Subjects (N = 986) Age Gender Social Faith Alcohol Support Activeness Abuse GPA .05 -.01 .09 ** -.10 ** -.19 ** Age -.12 ** -.05 .02 -.05 Gender .09 ** .04 -.07 Social Support (a) .12 ** -.12 ** Faith Activeness -.41 ** (a) Social Provisions Scale composite score.
Paul's language transcends the classification of persuasive rhetoric and demonstrates the activeness of God in the human social world.
Following are the construct measures examined: arousal-seeking tendency, attitude toward business ethics, motivation to conform, political and economic conservatism, coping with life, ethnocentrism, fashion consciousness, femininity, generosity, susceptibility to interpersonal influence, involvement with education, masculinity, materialism, patriotism, possessiveness, attitude toward product quality, attitude toward government regulation of business, risk aversion in product usage, risk taking in purchasing, self-concept, self-confidence, self-esteem, activeness in sports, enthusiasm for sports, time management, time pressure, venturesomeness, acceptance of authority, and motivation to work.
Hejinian writes from a specific domestic spot and with a keen awareness of the activeness of things, to the point where objects are often personified.
The main areas in which differences were found between PCK children and the comparison groups were in the organization of their activities and thinking, their activeness and initiative-taking, their perception of studies and school, the importance of home and family, their sense of belonging to the Ethiopian community, their ability to express emotion, and the nature of their social interactions.
He finds a multitude of connotations for "excessive erotics," "balanced erotics," "balanced erotics," "uncontrolled erotics," "successful erotics," "passiveness, activeness and aggressivity in erotics," "dominated activeness," "dominated passiveness," and so on.
While some of Richardson's discussion of ontology is a bit forced in order to fit the pieces into his system, major problems begin in the third chapter, "Value," which is comprised of three main issues: (1) How can Nietzsche's claims about the perspectival character of values be reconciled with the metavalues of power and activeness, which derive from the power ontology.
The distinction of Reservoir Dogs lies not merely in its formal perfection (the intricately nonchronological narrative structure) and the single-minded rigor with which its thesis ("reservoir dogs" end up eating each other) is worked out, but in its very particular relation to the contemporary crisis of "masculinity." The threat to masculinity represented by the growing emancipation, independence, and activeness of women has evoked a range of responses in the culture that are mirrored in Hollywood cinema.
While this may involve graduated exposure, it also involves more "activeness on the part of the therapist,' says S.