acknowledge

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acknowledge

To accept responsibility for something.In real estate,it means to sign an instrument in front of a notary public,who will certify that the signer stated the signature was an act of free will.

References in periodicals archive ?
The Award acknowledges the achievements of a distinguished artist who has made an outstanding and sustained contribution to music in Australia.
But for transgender activist Nisha Ayub, having a minister acknowledge her right to use the female toilet is already 'progress'.
Global Banking News-June 25, 2018--ANZ acknowledges lapses in dealings with clients
The post F5 Networks CEO acknowledges need for software focus appeared first on Tahawul Tech.
Ronaldo told ITV back in November he wanted to retire "with dignity," adding: "That does not mean it's bad play in the leagues of the United States, Qatar or Dubai, but I do not see myself there." Ronaldo acknowledges the standard of football has improved and claimed it could tempt him to make the move when he finally decides to leave the Bernabeu
COUNCIL officials have registered eight complaints since February from the Shakespeares about anti-social behaviour: February 23 - Vale housing officer Dee Brunton writes to them acknowledging their complaints but tells them: "These types of complaints are not easy to resolve." April 9 - Ms Brunton acknowledges receiving a diary from the Shakespeares detailing anti-social behaviour.
Curran acknowledges candidly in his memoir Loyal Dissent (Georgetown University Press): "I am aware that I have failed in my writing to deal with the issue of racism in our church and in our country....
In the introductory remarks of PG, Bishop Paul-Andre Durocher impressively states the goal of pastoral care of students in Catholic schools: "to help them be formed in the image of Christ." He acknowledges that "we have not always been sensitive to the particular needs of students with a same-sex orientation." Yet, although making the school community a truly Christian environment is a crucial goal of the resource guide, he wants us to know (unlike Arbour and Blackburn who want gayness "affirmed" and "accepted") that unless the dangers concerning homosexual inclination and practice are faced and accompany the Church's sound pastoral teaching and guidance, we will not succeed in meeting the needs of these students.
In a recent opinion upholding a death statute in Kansas, even Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia acknowledges that a minute risk of executing an innocent person does exist.
In turn, Asian children are "e-raced" in this marketplace, according to Katz Rothman, because they are likelier candidates for honorary whiteness: "Maybe [Chinese adoptees] will change our ideas about whiteness a bit more, letting white people look Asian the way white people can now look Irish, or look Jewish, and still be white." Although she acknowledges anti-Asian racism, her argument could have been better served by bringing in examples of Asian adoptees who haven't found assimilation to be such a seamless experience.
While acknowledging their differences, Robinson notes that "they share enough ideological ground to justify grouping them together under the label conservative." Robinson acknowledges, writing about this group challenges one's tolerance.
In addition, the team acknowledges that its testing, while extensive, didn't represent many aspects of a typical office building.