Accept

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Related to acceptably: scarcely, hurriedly, accordingly

Accept

1. To honor. For example, a bank may accept a check by depositing it into the appropriate account.

2. To take delivery for a commodity, security, or anything else one previously bought.
References in periodicals archive ?
We may not tell the truth perfectly, acceptably, blamelessly, but we're more likely to succeed if we support each other in getting it out there.
They may both be acceptably complex renderings of faithfulness, but each presents a different twist on the understanding of human will.
While the kidneys from younger donors generally functioned better than older kidneys, all of the successfully transplanted kidneys functioned acceptably, the researchers noted, and patient survival rates were comparable after 1, 2, and 3 years posttransplant.
This standard ensures that any contaminants that leach or migrate into potable water from rubber, plastic, metal, or other water system component materials are within acceptably safe levels.
Despite the presence of heritable variation for cold chipping, no cultivars exist that chip acceptably direct from 4[degrees]C storage.
1: The first critical gap is that we do not know if carbon conversion in LT-BLG conditions can be made acceptably high in kraft-liquor applications.
The car steers and handles acceptably, despite its skinny, 50-psi Michelins.
For example, when cities in the traveling-salesman problem are truly randomly distributed, the method generally fails to zero in quickly on an acceptably short route.
They must document maintenance and cleaning procedures, and the means by which acceptably designed and constructed equipment is used.
What with a gorilla suit, scarf dancing, and colored lights in its bag of acceptably cheap tricks, Luis De Abreu's KIT-1999 was knowing, audience-participation nonsense for a crowd eager for a little easy razzle-dazzle.
Given the nature of biographical methods, it seems to this reader that Spurlock and Magistro acceptably qualified their claims, expanded the number of women in their sample, and introduced significant interpretations of both popular culture and social science in order to deal with the problems of generalizing.
The methodology of behavior modeling -- developing equations that acceptably reproduce an observed object's linear or nonlinear behavior -- is the subject of this book.