Abstract

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Abstract

A brief summary at the beginning of an article, paper, or presentation. Abstracts are commonly associated with academia; for example, an economics professor may attach an abstract to a publication. However, it may also be used with a business presentation.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Hence, combining the two types of emerging metaphor, one based on metonymy--result for cause (Tendency I), and the other originating in discourse situations (Tendency II), what takes place is the modification of the former Old English structure and the increase in the level of abstractness. Moreover, the paper has also been built on the distinction between Old and Middle English semantic attributes in the analysed verb.
What is also increasingly visible is how inadequate the usual categories are, in light of the new blurring of conventional distinctions between abstractness and figuration, reference and reticence.
Watchful heads, some human, some not, dislocated hands, and ungainly detached feet momentarily resolve themselves out of abstractness and then subside, like a sudden scream.
She allows that not all trespasses are equally serious, but given the abstractness of the argument, it is difficult to see how people would distinguish among them to determine which ones are more serious.
The abstractness could be read as landscape only if we suppose we are looking down from helicopter height, distant enough that the emptiness takes over.
"How far that little candle throws his beams / So shines a good deed in a naughty world" or "There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio / Than are dreamt of in your philosophy." Both statements fuse concreteness with abstractness in a manner that is almost commonplace in Shakespeare.
For all of its abstractness, there is a strongly personal cast to Major's fiction.
The result of this method of analysis is a certain abstractness in the book, a tendency to deal more with ideas and their trajectories rather than material causes and events.
First, the paper identifies factors that can be used to define "college level," including intensity, abstractness, open-endedness, rigor, independence, and type of instructional materials.
Yet the ensemble generates a sense of complexity, relationships, and depth that, for all its abstractness, suggests a model of society, or even of the environment.
Hegel ascribes "abstractness" to the moral stances of both Socrates and Kant, an abstractness arising in both cases from the same cause: the assertion of the supremacy of the subjective ground of right and duty, and disregard for the rationality inherent in existing custom, the rationality that custom is itself unable to see.
Rathbone's contribution to the handsome catalogue of "Impressionist Still Life" is, among other things, an excellent discussion of this aspect of Manet.) Of course, this came as no surprise to anyone who had seen the wonderful show of Manet's still lifes at the Walters Art Gallery, Baltimore, in 2000, where the case for his stunning modernism was unequivocally made by--among other works--a deadpan, frontal painting of a melon from the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, regrettably not in the Boston show, which seemed to leave nothing possible as a follow-up but complete abstractness.