Absolutism

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Absolutism

The political theory that all power should belong to the state. According to absolutism, every corporation, religious organization, or other institution must give way to the state. Absolutism comes from the period in European history before and during the early development of capitalism during which monarchs attempted to centralize power. See also: Fascism.
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Hence we handle our Model Relationship as a plain correlation between two concrete POVs, where: the Relativistic POV plays the Observer, and calculates by the Target view he applies on the other Object; the other Object plays the Target, and works by the Absolutistic POV it has on board (this reproduces the familiar idea of the Proper, and of the Proper Parameters of an Object).
In either case, the results of both studies support the same theoretical assumption of REBT: There is an underlying irrational, absolutistic demand at the center of an individual's dysfunctional thought process.
Characteristic of these problematic beliefs are dogmatic and absolutistic expectations that the world should, must, or ought to be other than what it is.
Whilst a number of scholars translate paramartha both as the 'supreme goal' and 'the absolute', Nayak is very cautious about using the latter translation; he, instead, renders paramartha as the 'highest good' and comes to the conclusion that "The Sunyata philosophy of Nagarjuna and Candrakirti is critical philosophy par excellence and this should in no case be utilised for the purpose of establishing a metaphysical doctrine of the absolutistic, monistic, the transcendentalist or of any other type for that matter "(NCP, p.
And although the majority of the Hungarian nobility were hostile to the enlightened absolutistic Habsburg court, the messages of enlightenment drifting eastward from west of Vienna reached more and more people.
Absolutistic: At this level, originally referred to by Graves (1971) as sociocentric attitude, the impulses of the newly liberated self must be sacrificed and subjugated to an overarching order or transcendent purpose.
The Meiji Constitution adopted both the absolutistic theory that the sovereignty of the Emperor is based on the divine will of a god similar in theory to the divine right of kings on the one hand, and various principles of modern constitutionalism on the other....
Quite the contrary; in this view, it is the individual who claims to be able to stand apart form all such values and commitments and achieve utter value-neutrality who is making absolutistic claims.
A consistent pessimism in regard to man's rational capacity for justice leads to absolutistic political theories; for they prompt the conviction that only preponderant power can coerce the various vitalities of a community into a working harmony.
(21) Likewise, Loehe deplored the absolutistic claims made by Martin Stephan.
He shows how REBT is compatible with some important religious views and can be used effectively with many clients who have absolutistic beliefs about God and religion.
The Age of Reason Reader (NY: Viking Press, 1956), "Introduction." According to Nicholas Capaldi, Enlightenment "reason" as a self-knowledge and as a useful knowledge, especially pertaining to human nature, critically targeted feudal economy, religious intolerance, and absolutistic governments.