Absolutist


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Absolutist

A person who believes all power should belong to the state. According to absolutism, every corporation, religious organization, or other institution must give way to the state. Absolutism comes from the period in European history before and during the early development of capitalism during which monarchs attempted to centralize. See also: Fascism.
References in periodicals archive ?
China's seizure of portions of the West Philippine Sea is also a manifestation of absolutist thinking, or more specifically, of the xenocentric Chinese dream to take over the world.
McKenna's opposition to what she calls absolutist ethics leads to a certain vagueness in her own ethical stances.
This means that secularism restricted the authority of the church and democracy limited the absolutist rule and stipulated pluralism in the public life in the West; maybe there was no other choice.
From a strategic standpoint, absolutist rhetoric reflects the Justices' efforts to legitimize a decision to society.
Afghanistan had an absolutist but stable government system, according to the former finance minister, who regretted that the achievements had been forgotten.
This is the main reason why I feel that so much of the absolutist, almost apocalyptic, analysis of Egypt's condition is wrong and demeaning.
Though it is the first mobile game for which Absolutist appears as a publisher, it looks a pretty good start and a reason to await for more high-quality casual games from the company in the near future.
His approach is to use both a "relativist" perspective, examining the work of individual economists in the context of their times, and an "absolutist" perspective, revisiting older theories through the lens of modern insights into the workings of the economy.
The Proto-Totalitarian State: Punishment and Control in Absolutist Regimes.
This methodology successfully avoids the statist perspective of so many studies of early modern French noble culture--which often portray French nobles as factional courtiers who were gradually subdued by a rising 'absolutist' monarchy.
Familiar early "absolutist" commissions include Tribolo's 1537 Castello program, and the 1539 wedding apparato, each vaunting Cosimo's Apollonian autocracy.