Absolutism


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Absolutism

The political theory that all power should belong to the state. According to absolutism, every corporation, religious organization, or other institution must give way to the state. Absolutism comes from the period in European history before and during the early development of capitalism during which monarchs attempted to centralize power. See also: Fascism.
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To say there is something wrong with Rights Absolutism is not to
That danger is absolutism: extralegal, supralegal, and consolidated power, and the danger matters because administrative power revives this absolutism.
independence from parents) and less moral absolutism in their families.
I refer to that tenet as the new absolutism, (26) by which I mean that line of cases in which the Court has extended near absolute protection to expression for a particular reason, about which I will say more shortly.
Therefore, uprooting the malady of absolutism turns out to be a fight against religious uniqueness.
Throughout his book, Dee demonstrates the evolution of the paradigm of absolutism and the process of integration.
This debate leads to the definition of the political as the paradoxical oscillation between authoritarian absolutism and anarchic nihilism (170).
Supporting her argument with substantial data on the development of farce and on cultural, religious, and political events, Beam reconstructs a part of history from the pre-Religious Wars (1450-1550) until the establishment of absolutism in France (1550-1660).
Three sexual values were identified and defined with students asked to select the sexual value they currently adhered to: Absolutism was defined as "intercourse before marriage is wrong"; relativism-"if you are in a loving relationship, intercourse is ok even if not married"; and hedonism-"if it feels good, do it--being in love or being married don't matter.
In "Absolutism and the Marginalization of Festive Societies" and "Jesuit Theater: Christian Civility and Absolutism on the Civic stage" Beam grapples with the linkage between the emergence of absolutism and the demise of festive societies and amateur farce players, pointing up the lack of evidence of direct royal prohibitions.
Moreover, an added bonus is an understanding of absolutism that gets away from the now outdated view that is was primarily a historical process of royal power suppressing local privileges.
New York) Inaugurating a spectacular year at the Met, "Threads of Splendor" brought together some forty-five tapestries manufactured in Europe at the height of absolutism.