Pure Risk

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Pure Risk

Any risk in which there is no possibility of gain, only the avoidance of loss. For example, if a company car is stolen, the company endures a loss, but if it is not stolen, the company does not make a gain. Individuals and companies purchase insurance to mitigate the potential damage from a loss from pure risk. It is also called absolute risk.
References in periodicals archive ?
The study, published in the Internal Medicine Journal, says the absolute risk of a heart attack after contracting a chest infection is low, but warns people should take all preventative measures available to avoid getting sick.
Researchers at the University of Bristol found that the children of women who took pills in pregnancy were 41 per cent more likely to be autistic, although the absolute risk remains small.
However, the overall absolute risk was relatively low, translating into one additional case of venous blood clots for every 1,000 men per year, the study authors noted (BMJ, Nov.
The decision to use absolute risk to guide statin recommendations is based on the finding that the relative risk reduction seen with statin therapy is independent of baseline risk; thus, those with the highest absolute baseline CVD risk experience the greatest reduction in CVD events.
Absolute risk was much lower, the study published in the journal Public Library Of Science Medicine showed.
Then the researchers used standard statistical methods to calculate the absolute risk (or rate) and the relative risk (or rate ratio) of a serious age-related disease during follow-up in several ways, including (1) the overall absolute risk and relative risk of such a disease in HIV-positive versus HIV-negative people, and (2) the change in absolute risk and relative risk with (a) increasing age, (b) longer time since starting combination antiretroviral therapy, and (c) longer time measured in calendar years.
The 10-year estimated absolute risk of CKD among baseline users was 11.
use relative risk instead of absolute risk, NNT, and NNH statistics to prove efficacy but use absolute risk to prove safety.
However, the absolute risk of cancer was relatively low: less than 1% within the first 90 days after diagnosis of a venous leg ulcer.
For right ventricular outflow tract obstruction cardiac defects, the absolute risk would increase from 10 per 10,000 to 24 per 10,000.
For CD patients, the absolute risk of neuropathy was 64 per 100,000 patient-years, compared with 15 per 100,000 patient-years in the control group (hazard ratio, 2.