delivery

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Delivery

The tender and receipt of an actual commodity or financial instrument in settlement of a futures contract.
Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.

Delivery

The transfer of a security or an underlying asset to a buyer. The term is often used in options, forward, and futures contracts, in which payment and delivery are separated by a relatively long period of time. Most of the time, however, delivery does not occur, as most traders offset their positions with opposite contracts.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

delivery

1. The transfer of a security to an investor's broker in order to satisfy an executed sell order. Delivery is required by the settlement date.
2. The transfer of a specified commodity in order to meet the requirements of a commodity contract that has been sold.
Wall Street Words: An A to Z Guide to Investment Terms for Today's Investor by David L. Scott. Copyright © 2003 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. All rights reserved.

delivery

The transfer of possession from one person to another.Deeds and leases require delivery before they are effective. Delivery does not depend on manual transfer, but does depend on the intent of the parties. Deeds are delivered when placed within the possession or control of the grantee in such a manner that the grantor cannot regain possession or control.

The Complete Real Estate Encyclopedia by Denise L. Evans, JD & O. William Evans, JD. Copyright © 2007 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The results of our study were similar to Manohar S et al., and showed that rates of normal and interventional deliveries were not different among different consultants.11 That study compared vaginal delivery with interventional (instrumental and caesarean) deliveries while our study grouped normal and instrumental deliveries as vaginal delivery to compare it with abdominal delivery.
Among the patients admitted in various stages of labour, some were subjected to trial of labour and then operated upon and some were taken up for abdominal delivery straight away.
Especially in the USA, the pressure to avoid suboptimal perinatal outcomes is thought to be an increasing factor in decisions to perform a primary CS and tip the scales in favour of abdominal delivery in equivocal or 'non-reassuring' situations.