Zombies


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Zombies

Companies that continue operation while they await merger or closure, even though they are insolvent and bankrupt.

Zombie

A publicly-traded company that continues operations despite a merger or bankruptcy. Stocks in zombies are usually low in price because the companies are likely to cease operations (and the stocks will consequently become worthless). However, a few bottom feeders may be interested in a zombie if they believe that it can restructure and become profitable.
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The artwork featured zombie versions of Captain America, Deadpool, and Wolverine.
By that time, everybody loved and feared zombies. The very phrase 'zombie apocalypse' had entered the lexicon, representing fears of a world-ending event, with many even preparing for such an event happening in real life.
Anna and the Apocalypse is festive on top of everything else, the zombie plague taking place at the most wonderful time of the year; our heroes wave garlands of tinsel to distract the undead, while Anna declares that "Christmas is fast becoming my least-favourite C-word".
However, the shopping centres have been overrun by the zombies and somewhere inside lies the cure for saving humankind and ending the Zombie Nightmare.
Participants are encouraged to dress up as any character they would like to go through the Zombie Shoot.
And today Zombie Infection, which has featured on hit TV show Don't Tell the Bride, has announced it will be hiring staff for the over 18's attraction soon.
The cover illustration, a transformation of Andy Warhol's Marilyn Diptych with a zombified Marilyn Monroe, promises a pop-culture look at zombies that does not disappoint.
The Zombie Research Society defines a zombie as "a relentlessly aggressive human or reanimated human corpse driven by a biologic infection" (http://zombieresearchsociety.com/about-us).
For instance, if everyone who gets bitten by a zombie turns into a zombie, and Bob was bitten by a zombie, then we know that Bob will soon be a zombie.
Aubert's zombie religion also recalls the longer history of the genre.
But let us now move to the 1950s, when pulp fiction success decreases and zombies are transferred to comic books.
The chapter on the Haitian Revolution and early zombic history, for instance, does not seem intended so much for historians of the Caribbean as for members of the Zombie Research Society and like-minded Americanists, to provide them with a deeper understanding of the zombie's Afro-Caribbean roots.