Zionism

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Zionism

The political view that Jews have a right to national homeland in Palestine roughly corresponding to the borders of Biblical Israel. Zionism emerged as a nationalist movement in 19th-century Europe as secular and assimilated Jews did not find wide acceptance in European society. Many, though not all, early Zionists were socialists; this led to the establishment of communal farms in Palestine. Religious Zionism was initially a minor part of the movement, but has grown in importance since the 1960s. After the establishment of the States of Israel in 1948, the Zionist movement has concentrated on maintaining or expanding Israel's borders and/or influence. Proponents of Zionism believe a Jewish homeland is the only place Jews can be perfectly safe from persecution, while critics contend that Palestinian Arabs have been displaced and discriminated against since the early 20th century.
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The significance of Weizmann's political decline should be understood in the light of his extraordinary importance in the Zionist movement. As one of the chief architects of the Balfour Declaration, Weizmann's authority to lead the movement was widely recognized.
What do you think a pledge of support from Britain meant to the Arabs and to the Jews of the Zionist movement? Explain.
In response to criticism of his proposal to give the Zionist movement a larger piece of land than they officially requested, Canadian Supreme Court justice Ivan C.
Gavison discusses the development of the Zionist movement after 1947 and the major challenges facing the Zionist movement after the establishment of the State of Israel such as the relations between the Jewish and Palestinian population in the Jewish state, the role of identity and Zionism in Israel after 1948, in particular with respect to the still up-to-date relationship between the Jewish character of the State of Israel and Israeli citizenship.
Zionist agents will do their best to urge Jews everywhere to visit Eretz Israel and see the endless rows of orderly Jewish graves, the final achievement of the Zionist movement.
In contrast to previous studies, Or argues that women played an important role in the German Zionist Movement and that their voice was heard in public.
Sixty-five years after the United Nations General Assembly vote to partition Palestine into an Arab state and a Jewish state, the General Assembly has returned to vote on granting Palestine "non-member observer state status." The Jews were happy on 29 November 1947 with the partition resolution and considered it the beginning of their path to cementing the foundations of the state of Israel that they dreamed of establishing, to carry out the Zionist movement's project.
A meticulously researched biodoc, "It Is No Dream" focuses on how Austro-Hungarian journalist-playwright Theodor Herzl catalyzed the political Zionist movement, ultimately leading to the creation of the modern state of Israel.
In support of my claim in The Moral Lives of Israelis: Reinventing the Dream State that the Zionist movement was "messianic," which Nachman Ben-Yehuda emphatically denies, I could quote a dozen sources, beginning perhaps with the philosopher Leo Strauss and Baruch Ben Yehuda, who penned the History of Zionism: The Movement for Renaissance and Redemption in Israel, and ending with a recent book by the Israeli sociologist Oz Almog, who wrote in The Sabra: The Creation of the New Jew that "most Zionist spiritual and political leaders ...
The daily said that some rightwing Israeli groups expressed relief that "Y" was overlooked for Cohen "who wears the (religious) skullcap (kippah) and who is affiliated with the religious Zionist movement."
Many biographers described Hezl's journey to Zionism and his development as the leader of the Zionist movement (including A.
Coltescu, 2005) Inspired by this principle in the Second Congress of the Zionist movement, held in 1898 in Basel, dr.