Zionism

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Zionism

The political view that Jews have a right to national homeland in Palestine roughly corresponding to the borders of Biblical Israel. Zionism emerged as a nationalist movement in 19th-century Europe as secular and assimilated Jews did not find wide acceptance in European society. Many, though not all, early Zionists were socialists; this led to the establishment of communal farms in Palestine. Religious Zionism was initially a minor part of the movement, but has grown in importance since the 1960s. After the establishment of the States of Israel in 1948, the Zionist movement has concentrated on maintaining or expanding Israel's borders and/or influence. Proponents of Zionism believe a Jewish homeland is the only place Jews can be perfectly safe from persecution, while critics contend that Palestinian Arabs have been displaced and discriminated against since the early 20th century.
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com/2017/07/24/theodor-herzl-on-using-antisemitism-as-controlled-opposition-quote/) Theodor Herzl on Using Antisemitism as Controlled Opposition (Quote)] or the existing leader of the Zionist Movement Benjamin Netanyahu (https://www.
The Zionist movement did not send any assistance, financial or otherwise, for the victims of Nazism and it did not allow any other side to provide any kind of aid.
By the 1920s they supported the Zionist movement, denying the right of self-determination to the people in Palestine.
In support of my claim in The Moral Lives of Israelis: Reinventing the Dream State that the Zionist movement was "messianic," which Nachman Ben-Yehuda emphatically denies, I could quote a dozen sources, beginning perhaps with the philosopher Leo Strauss and Baruch Ben Yehuda, who penned the History of Zionism: The Movement for Renaissance and Redemption in Israel, and ending with a recent book by the Israeli sociologist Oz Almog, who wrote in The Sabra: The Creation of the New Jew that "most Zionist spiritual and political leaders .
The daily said that some rightwing Israeli groups expressed relief that "Y" was overlooked for Cohen "who wears the (religious) skullcap (kippah) and who is affiliated with the religious Zionist movement.
In Yonatan Silverman's article on NIH (Fall 2010 edition), he refers to Chaim Weizmann's belief that NIH had an important role to play in the Zionist Movement, particularly with respect to forming an alliance with the British.
Convinced that people must be trained and educated not only spiritually but also physically, representatives of the Zionist movement have campaigned to establish a greatest number of sports associations among Jewish population.
What sets this story apart from others is that it unfolds against the backdrop of a growing Zionist movement in the Mandated Territories of Palestine, an influx of Jewish immigrants and an outflow of Arab refugees to neighbouring lands.
Srebrnik situates the Birobidzhan project within the broader context of territorialism, the proto-Zionist doctrine that emanated from the so-called Uganda Plan of 1903 which was ultimately rejected by Herzl and the Zionist movement.
The book contains correspondence between Einstein and members of government, with luminaries of his day, and between him and Zionist leadership (as well as members of the Irgun) debating the Zionist movement.
The Palestinian struggle has long been seen, rightly or wrongly, as a nationalist struggle between a mostly secular Zionist movement and an Arab nationalist, and later Palestinian, nationalist movement, a view much too simplistic from the beginning.
The Christian Zionist movement continues to strengthen the important bonds in the U.