Zionism


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Zionism

The political view that Jews have a right to national homeland in Palestine roughly corresponding to the borders of Biblical Israel. Zionism emerged as a nationalist movement in 19th-century Europe as secular and assimilated Jews did not find wide acceptance in European society. Many, though not all, early Zionists were socialists; this led to the establishment of communal farms in Palestine. Religious Zionism was initially a minor part of the movement, but has grown in importance since the 1960s. After the establishment of the States of Israel in 1948, the Zionist movement has concentrated on maintaining or expanding Israel's borders and/or influence. Proponents of Zionism believe a Jewish homeland is the only place Jews can be perfectly safe from persecution, while critics contend that Palestinian Arabs have been displaced and discriminated against since the early 20th century.
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in the second half of the 19th century, will have the necessary ideological power to defeat Zionism.
Part Three brings the reader from the Cold War to the present, and it is in this section that Goldman appears to rely most heavily on work already done by scholars of Zionism in the United States.
Loeffler's juxtaposition of Zionism, internationalism, and human rights dissolves this dichotomy by focusing on theorists deeply invested in Jewish collective life and also dedicated to solving universal political questions.
Jewish opposition to Zionism has a long and distinguished history.
When "Zionism" becomes embedded with loaded but unspoken meanings, it has real implications for the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.
A person identifying as both a feminist and a Zionist must therefore ask challenging questions: Is there room within my Zionism to fight for the rights of Palestinian women alongside those of Israelis?
Therefore it is likely that Nazis would have supported this and seen it as a form of "Zionism".
Deconstructing Zionism is dedicated to Jacques Derrida.
The book points out strong relations between Ben Gurion, one of the founders of Zionism and Adolf Hitler, head of German Nazism, and displays details of a secret relationship between both.
The debate surrounding Judith Butler's work on Israel and Zionism has arguably reached a new level of vitriol from various camps in the American Jewish establishment.
The authors apply the same diagnosis to "Christian Zionism." Nearly all Americans, many of the authors are associated with the indispensable Sabeel Ecumenical Liberation Theology Center--Naim Ateek provides the forward--and all are rightly moved by the plight of occupied Palestinians and disturbed by Jewish religious nationalism.
In the aftermath of a withering blast of criticism from Jewish advocacy groups--and from some Presbyterians--there's scant evidence of much middle ground between those perspectives on "Zionism Unsettled," the handiwork of the Israel/Palestine Mission Network of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.).