Brass

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Brass

An alloy of copper and zinc. It has low friction and so is used in manufactured products such as gears and valves. It is also used in musical instruments.. It may be traded as a commodity on exchanges such as the London Metal Exchange.
References in periodicals archive ?
Vickers Hardness Measured for Copper-Manganese Alloys and Handbook Values for Other Cast Copper Alloys Alloy HV * (kg/[mm.sup.2]) Cu-35Mc 93 [+ or -] 4.1 Cu-35Mn, carbide containing 111 [+ or -] 1.9 C-110, recast 56 [+ or -] 1.6 C857 yellow brass 83 C932 bearing bronze 73 C836 red brass 65 C898 Bi-Sn bronze 65 C875 silicon brass 131 * Commercial alloy values from Metals Handbook, converted from Brinell (500 kg) values using ASTM conversion table for catridge brass.
These alloys can be used as direct replacements for leaded red and yellow brasses in casting applications.
Results--The cooling curve analysis successfully predicted the onset of fading and grain refinement in yellow brasses. Thermal analysis (Fig.
In the presentation, "Evaluation of Grain Refinement of Leaded Yellow Brass and EnviroBrass III using Thermal Analysis," (03-119) J.
Based on results of the electrochemical polarization and salt fog tests, high manganese brass (C99700) is the most corrosion-resistant alloy and high strength yellow brass (C86300) and aluminum bronze (C95400) are the least resistant to corrosion.
Globe Valve, Delphi, Indiana, casts a red brass alloy (6% lead), CDA848, using green sand molds and a low-lead yellow brass alloy (1.2% lead), CDA857-10 B2, using a low-pressure permanent mold process.
The yellow brass (C86300) and aluminum-bronze (C95400) are the least resistant to corrosion in all the test environments.
The mechanical, fracture toughness, impact and fatigue properties of 13 lead-free copper alloys (aluminum bronzes, yellow brass, high-strength yellow brass, silicon brass, manganese yellow brasses and the high-copper alloys) were measured.
Artemeu, Carlton Univ., discussed AFS Research that focused on the effect of an aluminum addition on the microstructure and fluidity of high zinc yellow brass. This study utilized casting process modeling.
The yellow brass (C85500, C85800 and B-2) group is the most widely used alloy in the U.S.
The low-zinc yellow brass (C85200) also was susceptible to drossing and hot tearing, while the high-zinc yellow brass (C85800) was prone to drossing but not to hot tearing.
Of the four commonly accepted alternatives to leaded copper alloys (Bi-Cu, yellow brasses, Cu-Si and aluminum bronzes), copper/bismuth-based alloys are the most widely discussed and generally accepted.