Yaounde Convention

Yaounde Convention

A treaty between the European Community and several newly independent states in Africa. The relationship the Yaounde Convention established was relatively similar to the one that existed between the European countries and their former colonies. It expired in 1975 and was replaced by the Lome Convention.
References in periodicals archive ?
at 727-33 (commenting on the transition from the Yaounde Convention to the Arusha Convention as less-developed countries began to establish a greater role in the public eye.
It will cover the modern timeline following the historical relationship between the EU and ACP countries by explaining the Treaty of Rome (during colonial rule), the Yaounde Conventions, the Lome Conventions, the Cotonou Agreement, and the current EPAs between the European Union and different ACP regions.
(101) As the countries were no longer territories of the EEC member states, the Yaounde Conventions were created to, more or less, establish a similar relationship that had been afforded to all territories under the Treaty of Rome.
However, unlike the Yaounde Conventions, the trade preferences were non-reciprocal.
The European Community began to develop its relations with the independent African countries under the banner of the Yaounde Convention I (1963-1969) and Yaounde Convention II (1969-1975).
Whiteman retraces the origins of the Eurafrique concept and resumes the history of EU interregional cooperation with Africa from the Yaounde convention to the Europe-Africa strategic partnership.
The EIB has been present in Africa since 1963, following the signature of the first Yaounde Convention. This agreement established contractual relations between Europe and 18 African states, Madagascar and Mauritius in the areas of trade, market access and development and its financing.
The Yaounde Conventions were succeeded by the Lome Conventions.
From 1975 to 2000 ACP-EC relations were governed by the regularly adapted and updated Lome Conventions (Lome I - Lome IV) the successor of the Yaounde Conventions.
The EIB has granted loans beyond its member states' borders since 1963, but this activity took on a different dimension with the numerous association agreements signed with states in the Mediterranean region and with the Lome and Yaounde Conventions. Indeed, soon after the United Kingdom joined the EEC, the independent states of the Commonwealth joined the Lome Convention, which meant there were 46 states in Africa, the Caribbean and the Pacific (ACP) associated with the EEC and eligible to receive EIB loans.
The Association was set up in 1964 to recruit and manage technical experts in the signatory countries of the two Yaounde Conventions. In 1988, all staff provided by EAC in the EU Delegations to the African, Caribbean and Pacific nations were established civil servants.
It followed on from the two Yaounde Conventions (1963 to 1975) and introduced the key concept of partnership and respect for the sovereignty of the ACP states while considerably extending the number of ACP signatories (from 18 to 46 countries).