The Wall Street Journal

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The Wall Street Journal

A major newspaper in the United States. While it covers all news, it is particularly well known for its coverage of financial markets, stocks, business and similar issues. Its editorial page is commonly considered to have a conservative viewpoint. It was founded in 1889 and was purchased by News Corp (which bought its parent company, Dow Jones) in 2007.
References in periodicals archive ?
We are extremely proud to work with the WSJ Pro team to offer our product to a whole new subset of the financial services community.
Al-Qudaimi told the WSJ thatall the books in his stall had been pre-approved by the ministry and that most of them have been sold there in previous years.
The WSJ had earlier reported that Berkshire Hathaway Inc (NYSE:BRK.
According to the WSJ, among the most influential expatriates are: Tim Clark, president of Emirates airline; Michael Tomalin, group chief executive of National Bank of Abu Dhabi; Yousuf Ali M.
In addition, in conjunction with these efforts, the WSJ.
Independently conducted research confirmed that tenant communication amenities--specifically The WSJ Office Network, screens featuring close-captioned CNN or CNBC in lobbies, or Captivate NetworkTM in elevators--are viewed as extremely valuable and desirable by both tenants and real estate executives, at a rate of more than 80%.
This study focuses on the WSJ since it potentially represents a low-cost, timely, and widely-disseminated source of distress disclosure information.
The Wall Street Journal Online has announced a new mobile web version of WSJ.
The poll came as President Bush proposed an insurance initiative that threatens a possible tax increase for many upper-income people, reported the WSJ.
A January 2006 WSJ article cites that Venture Capital dollars are now flowing to companies with WOM expertise in various industries.
However, Associated Press (AP) reported that GM spokesperson for advanced technology Scott Fosgard said there is "no truth" to the Asian WSJ report, while Toyota spokesperson Paul Nalasco declined to comment.
It is essential for the writer to avoid confusion with shinny, which the WSJ writer did.