Writer

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Writer

The seller of an option, usually an individual, bank, or company that issues the option and consequently has the obligation to sell the asset (if a call) or to buy the asset (if a put) on which the option is written if the option buyer exercises the option.

Option Writer

One who originally sells an option contract. In exchange for the premium, the option writer takes on an obligation to buy or sell (depending on the type of option) the underlying asset at the discretion of the option holder. For example, in a call, the option writer must sell the underlying asset to the option holder if the holder decides to exercise the option. If the option writer does not already have a long position in the underlying asset, he/she must obtain one so as to sell the position and fulfill the contract.

writer

The person who creates an option by selling an option contract in an opening transaction. An investor may be the writer of a call or a put. See also naked writer.

Writer.

In the options market, a writer is someone who sells put or call options, an activity known as writing a call or writing a put.

Unlike the buyer, or holder, of an option, who can exercise an option or let it expire, as the writer you must meet the terms of the contract if the option is exercised and assigned to you.

You collect a premium for selling the option, which may provide a profit if the option expires worthless, and you always have the right, before exercise, to buy an offsetting contract and end your obligation to buy or sell.

References in classic literature ?
All of the men and women the writer had ever known had become grotesques.
Concerning the old carpenter who fixed the bed for the writer, I only mentioned him because he, like many of what are called very common people, became the nearest thing to what is understandable and lovable of all the grotesques in the writer's book.
The fact that in the "Iliad" Menelaus came to a banquet without waiting for an invitation, determines the writer of the "Odyssey" to make him come to a banquet, also uninvited, but as circumstances did not permit of his having been invited, his coming uninvited is shown to have been due to chance.
The writer here interrupts an Iliadic passage (to which she returns immediately) for the double purpose of dwelling upon the slaughter of the heifer, and of letting Nestor's wife and daughter enjoy it also.
It is plain therefore that the audience for whom the "Odyssey" was written was one that would be unlikely to know anything about the topography of the Peloponnese, so that the writer might take what liberties she chose.
Our modern authors of comedy have fallen almost universally into the error here hinted at; their heroes generally are notorious rogues, and their heroines abandoned jades, during the first four acts; but in the fifth, the former become very worthy gentlemen, and the latter women of virtue and discretion: nor is the writer often so kind as to give himself the least trouble to reconcile or account for this monstrous change and incongruity.
Within these few restrictions, I think, every writer may be permitted to deal as much in the wonderful as he pleases; nay, if he thus keeps within the rules of credibility, the more he can surprize the reader the more he will engage his attention, and the more he will charm him.
If the writer strictly observes the rules above-mentioned, he hath discharged his part; and is then intitled to some faith from his reader, who is indeed guilty of critical infidelity if he disbelieves him.
The lama would have been more annoyed than the priest had he known how the bazar letter- writer had translated his phrase 'to acquire merit
The writer has lived, for many years, on the frontier-line of slave states, and has had great opportunities of observation among those who formerly were slaves.
There is nothing that they are not willing to give or do to have their children instructed, and, so far as the writer has observed herself, or taken the testimony of teachers among them, they are remarkably intelligent and quick to learn.
The writer well remembers an aged colored woman, who was employed as a washerwoman in her father's family.