work

(redirected from Workless)
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Work

1. To perform a task, especially in exchange for compensation or the potential for profit. Working is necessary for any economy to function.

2. See: Job.

work

see JOB, LABOUR, WORK ORGANIZATION, SOCIOLOGY OF WORK, HOMEWORKING, DOMESTIC LABOUR.

work

see JOB.
References in periodicals archive ?
The figures mean that there are around 9,100 workless households in both Shropshire and Telford & Wrekin, and 5,000 in Powys.
While the rate of children in workless households is actually an improvement from 21.1%, in 2017, Liverpool still had the worst rate of children in workless households across Merseyside.
"Around half of children in workless families are living with parents who have at least three potential barriers to work, such as ill health, low qualifications or lone parenthood.
Not only does worklessness reduce family income, it can lead to parental conflict and poor mental health, and many workless families are held back by disadvantages such as problem debt, drug and alcohol dependency, and homelessness.
New figures today (6 March 2019) from the Office for National Statistics revealed that since 2010 the number of workless households has fallen by over a million to a record low while the number of children in workless households is down by 665,000.
The government's analysis shows children in workless families are almost twice as likely to not reach the expected level at all stages of their education.
London has seen the greatest decrease in the percentage of children in long-term workless households, falling 12.9% to 8.5% over the past decade.
The new statistics also show that the proportion of children in Scotland living in workless households has decreased by half a point to 11.8 per cent, or just under one in eight children.
Policy director Lily Caprani said: "A signifi-cant drop in the number of children living in workless households is good news but, as we know from our work up and down the country, it is deeply concerning that for far too many families a move into work is sadly not a move out of poverty.
The figures showed that 1.8 million children lived in these workless households, as did five million people aged 16 to 64.