work

(redirected from Workless)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia.

Work

1. To perform a task, especially in exchange for compensation or the potential for profit. Working is necessary for any economy to function.

2. See: Job.

work

see JOB, LABOUR, WORK ORGANIZATION, SOCIOLOGY OF WORK, HOMEWORKING, DOMESTIC LABOUR.

work

see JOB.
References in periodicals archive ?
The number of children living in lone parent households which are long-term workless has fallen 73,000 on the year.
The ONS defines a workless household as one where no one aged 16 and over is in employment.
Across the UK an average of 18% of households are workless.
Policy director Lily Caprani said: "A signifi-cant drop in the number of children living in workless households is good news but, as we know from our work up and down the country, it is deeply concerning that for far too many families a move into work is sadly not a move out of poverty.
Without exception, these workless parents strongly encouraged their children to lead productive lives.
Sickness, both long-term and temporary, was the main reason given for not working by those people aged 16 to 64 living in workless households, accounting for 1.
Employment minister Chris Grayling said the fall in workless families was encouraging, but added: "We can't be complacent".
Unite/CPHVA professional officer Dave Munday stated: 'It is a vicious cycle--those from workless families will be less likely to find work themselves, and there are many health determinants associated with that.
Report after report has laid out the problems children growing up in workless households face: they are more likely to fail at school, become involved in criminal behaviour, develop addictions to drink and drugs and ultimately end up workless themselves.
We will re-fashion institutions to bring the workless class back into society.
a record low number of workless households, 608,000 fewer children living in workless households since 2010, a rise in the proportion of people saving for retirement.
Demonising welfare recipients and setting the working poor against the workless poor has been a contemptible Conservative strategy for years.