Working Class

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Working Class

The class of persons who perform physical labor, skilled labor, domestic duties or similar tasks. Persons in the working class often earn an hourly wage and many (though far from all) have low job security. Examples of those with working class occupations include food servers, miners and construction workers. Some, though not all, are poorly paid. The working class is closely related to, but distinct from, the working poor. See also: Blue collar.
References in periodicals archive ?
His working classes are naturally subservient, only in need of paternal-organic guidance, and desire only to work for the sake of working.
In order to jump one step ahead of the property developers, Seki wanted to build low-cost, high-quality municipal housing on undeveloped land to provide a pleasant environment for the working classes. Seki became mayor in 1923, finally acquiring the power to push through his reforms.
The book repeatedly seems to suggest that there were only Chartist periodicals available to the working classes for several decades, ignoring alternatives.
The working class will mobilize despite racism; other working classes, no less racist than ours, have been mobilized around class based instruments.
Britain's "wealthy working classes" are very heavily concentrated in the South East, the South West, and Outer London, while Britain's poorer working classes are much more evenly distributed across the country.
This strong sense of community is seen as a crucial component of the Cockney spirit, which allowed members of the working classes to overcome their poverty, their poor living conditions and, eventually, even the bombing campaigns of the Luftwaffe.
Breton finds that Orwell successfully criticizes both the liberals and the socialists for failing to accept the working classes: by showing the socialists to be guilty of all the attitudes toward workers that liberals have been accused of, Orwell reveals that "intellectual socialism (which is not to say unions or the Labour Party) had made few connections to the poor, except perhaps theoretically" (Breton).
In New England, people protested the drafting of citizens for the Revolutionary War as some, thing that hit the working classes hardest.
Riders in Hepp's study recognized that their environment insulated them to a significant extent from the working classes, and appreciated it: one of Hepp's diarists described the entire greater Philadelphia area as "one great big stretch of middle class (168)," and another recorded visits to South Philadelphia's Italian community and to Chinatown as though they were tourist excursions.
These studies have demonstrated how the working classes contested with others on and for the urban terrain; often their neighborhoods' active uses of the street and public areas established their control over those spaces.
These beliefs about child development, coupled with the increased use and moral uncertainty of the nighttime street, were what motivated the middleclass concern about "night children." In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, social reformers and public officials strove to bring the blessings of a proper childhood to the urban poor and working classes. (18) The boys' club, child labor, and curfew movements were part of this larger project of cultural evangelism.
[9] If gender attended the birth of the English working classes, was it also present at their (apparent) death?