Working Life

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Working Life

The time during which an adult is expected to be working or pursuing work. One's working life begins after the completion of education and ends at retirement. In general, most of one's savings and investments occurs during the working life because this is when one has the highest cash flow and, sometimes, the willingness to take risks.
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References in periodicals archive ?
This collection of nearly a dozen essays explores theoretical connections in understanding women's working lives. The essays are organized into three sections on challenges to and changes in women's careers, women's life transitions and work, and studies of specific fields.
Dr Van Laar said: "The quality of people's working lives is not as straightforward as it at first might appear.
The aim of the survey is to gather information that will improve not only the working lives of NHS staff, but also help to provide better care for patients.
Offering maternity, paternity, adoption or parental leave in excess of the statutory minimum is another way to give staff more control over their working lives and will also foster greater employee loyalty and commitment.
It is common knowledge that women carry the significant burden of domestic work, child care and other dependent family members' care, on top of their paid working lives. For NZNO, which is a predominantly female union, the issue of achieving a positive work/life balance is essential, if our members are to live healthy and satisfying lives.
Consider ways in which organisational procedures and activities could be improved in order to make employees' working lives less frenetic, stressful, or tiring.
Socio-technical systems theory is based on two underlying assumptions: (a) organizational performance can be improved by allowing employees at lower levels to assume more responsibility for their efforts, and (b) employees will become more responsible and self-directed as their work offers opportunities to fulfill important psychological needs, such as learning, growth, self-esteem and significance in their working lives (Pasmore et al., 1982).
The competition is being organised by the NSPCC to recognise the achievements of employers who help parents juggle busy working lives with caring for their children.
A number of recent surveys have shown that a large proportion of employees feel that striking the right work/life balance allows them more time to focus on their life outside work and to achieve greater control of their working lives.
This mismatch between potrayal and reality is useful to know and the conclusion does supply an appropriate lead-in to the analysis of working lives but what are we to make of it?