Work from Home

(redirected from Worked at Home)

Work from Home

To conduct business from one's residence as opposed to an office. Some employees may work from home on a temporary or project basis; for example, one may work from home on a weekend when the office is closed. However, others, notably the self-employed, work from home regularly because they do not have offices. The advent of home computers and the Internet have made working from home easier.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved
References in classic literature ?
Philip spent all day at the hospital and worked at home in the evening except when he went to the Athelnys' or to the tavern in Beak Street.
And while Raleigh's captains tried to found a new England in the New World, Raleigh himself worked at home to bring order into the vast estates the Queen had given to him in Ireland.
And so I worked at home and did cleaning and nursing and washing for a long time before I began to go out.
He worked at home in the manner of a man who means to get on, but did not shut himself up severely for that purpose.
Census Bureau data show that in 2010, 4.2 million more people worked at home compared to 1999, an increase from 7 percent to 9.5 percent.
Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS, the Bureau) productivity data--is that official estimates of productivity growth may be overstated because estimates of hours worked may not include unpaid hours worked at home. To shed light on this debate, this article examines two recent sources of data on U.S.
In 2001 approximately 137,000 early childhood educators and assistants, of whom 44,000 worked at home, and 93,000 worked in a child care centre or nursery school
In other occupational groups, the proportion who regularly worked at home ranged from about 5 to 7 percent, but more than half in these groups were compensated for their home work.
While in 1900 girls often worked at home so that their brothers could stay in school, in the 1950s Italians put more value on the opportunities that education opened up to their daughters, and boys left school earlier to take advantage of openings in skilled blue collar work.
The next three rows of table 3 report regressions in which the scalar "working at home" is replaced with a vector of binary variables indicating how often an individual worked at home. Women who reported working at home at least once a week exhibited a positive wage differential of 7.1 cents per hour; men in the same category had a positive wage differential of 12.4 cents per hour.
Sales representatives also often worked at home: about 40 percent of nonretail sales representatives and 38 percent of finance sales representatives did some work at home.