Woodcut

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Woodcut

A block of wood with a letter or image cut into it. Woodcuts were used as an early way to print materials in large quantities. They developed in Asia.
References in periodicals archive ?
RAWALPINDI -- The art works of Japanese Woodblock Prints made by the participants of a week-long workshop held earlier was showcased in an exhibition inaugurated here on Wednesday at the Rawalpindi Arts Council.
Nakayama, 85, has made 242 woodblock prints during his professional career which spans 54 years.
edu/aic/collections/asian/highlights View selected works from the Art Institute of Chicago's extensive Asian art department, including woodblock prints by Katsukawa Shunsho, Hokusai, and others.
Hundertwasser's woodblock prints were created over a period of several years, bringing together the artist, two engravers, and a printer.
It's hard to believe this is a woodblock print and one would be correct to study it in disbelief, because it was created in a very nontraditional manner.
More than 200 images of early maps of Japan, including examples of some especially rare woodblock print maps of the city of Edo (now Tokyo), from UC's East Asian Library Japanese Historical Map Collection are represented in the online collection found at http://www.
DELICATE Corrections, a work by Annu Vertanen, from Finland TRADITIONAL One of the Yoshikawa prints in the exhibition DEMONSTRATION Fusako Yoshikawa will be visiting Northern Print FAMOUS The Great Wave off Kanagawa by Katsushika Hokusai THREE DIMENSIONAL Untitled, a woodblock print by Paul Furneaux
While Wright developed his love for Japanese art in the 1890s, he began acquiring a large number of prints by woodblock print masters since his first visit to Japan in 1905.
Entertainment Editor Max Palevsky remembers walking down a New York City street years ago when he saw his first Japanese woodblock print and told his friends he was going to buy one.
Nelson Sandgren, who died in 2006, was primarily known as a painter but also worked in a variety of print mediums, including monoprint, lithograph and woodblock print, in both black-and-white and color.
Our own Thomas Bewick was a pioneer of the woodblock print in the late 18th Century and his minute and intricate artworks can be seen at the Laing Art Gallery until October 3.
Over the past few years, Marshall has shown animated video installations, pencil studies of fake flowers, giant rubber stamps that print out Black Power slogans, and a monumental woodblock print, among other things.