Woodcut

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Woodcut

A block of wood with a letter or image cut into it. Woodcuts were used as an early way to print materials in large quantities. They developed in Asia.
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RAWALPINDI -- The art works of Japanese Woodblock Prints made by the participants of a week-long workshop held earlier was showcased in an exhibition inaugurated here on Wednesday at the Rawalpindi Arts Council.
The illustrations and text help to explain how Japanese woodblock prints were made.
Dubbed as one of the last great techniques of the art world, the Japanese woodblock print is an ancient art form which was first used in the 8th century in printing religious texts.
THESE beautiful woodblock prints of birds of prey are by one of Japan's leading artists and printmakers, Tachibana Morikuni.
Hand-carved woodblock prints make perfect holiday cards and gifts.
Japanese woodblock prints were introduced to Hundertwasser in 1950.
According to Wiley, most of the objects were in his studio at the time he created his original watercolor, titled Your Own Blush & Flood (1982), upon which this woodblock print is based.
Color woodblock print, www.asian americanbooks.com/obatagal.htm
Each sheet sells for 1,100 yen and includes five 80 yen stamps and five 50 yen stamps each featuring a famous ukiyoe Japanese woodblock print, with a personal photo printed next to each stamp so that stamp and photo can be used as pair.
DELICATE Corrections, a work by Annu Vertanen, from Finland TRADITIONAL One of the Yoshikawa prints in the exhibition DEMONSTRATION Fusako Yoshikawa will be visiting Northern Print FAMOUS The Great Wave off Kanagawa by Katsushika Hokusai THREE DIMENSIONAL Untitled, a woodblock print by Paul Furneaux
Tickets Mon pounds 7, concs pounds 5, all other performances pounds 10, concs pounds 8, details 01642 586180 or 531519 Exhibition: Danger...female artist at work Steelworks work of art in wood Zoe Wilson of the Dorman Museum with a woodblock print which is part of previously unseen images of Tees steelmaking in the exhibition by Yorkshire artist Viva Talbot who created the images in the 1930s when it was almost unknown for women to be allowed access to the dangerous steelworks Viva Talbot exhibition: Dorman Museum, Middlesbrough, until July 18.
While Wright developed his love for Japanese art in the 1890s, he began acquiring a large number of prints by woodblock print masters since his first visit to Japan in 1905.