Thomas Edison

(redirected from Wizard of Menlo Park)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.
Related to Wizard of Menlo Park: Tesla, Nikola Tesla

Thomas Edison

An American businessman and inventor. He is especially known for inventing the light bulb, but he also created the phonograph, which laid the foundation for much of modern telecommunications. He founded General Electric. Edison lived from 1847 to 1931.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
One of Stross's main tasks in The Wizard of Menlo Park is to penetrate this veneer and to distinguish between Edison the myth and Edison the man.
Overall, The Wizard of Menlo Park brings into sharp and dramatic focus the extent to which modern society and its patterns of mass leisure are indebted to the inventions of Thomas Alva Edison.
We also enjoyed a virtual tour of the reconstructed Menlo Park laboratory; in 1929 the "birthplace" of the phonograph and the incandescent lamp was moved from New Jersey to Greenfield Village, Michigan -- lock, stock, and barrel, mind you -- by Henry Ford, the Wizard of Menlo Park's pal and fellow magnate, to celebrate the light bulb's fiftieth anniversary.
He was a professorial, though untutored, scientist; he was an alchemist, an intimate of Mme Blavatsky, and a card-carrying Theosophist; he was a tinkerer, a Yankee mechanic, innocent of theoretical knowledge, like Alexander Graham Bell and Eli Whitney; he was the Wizard of Menlo Park, progressing beyond the normal human range; he was a Horatio Alger hero, a financial success; he was a financier, the cynically manipulative cohort of Jay Gould and J.P.
By the time he turned his attention to moving pictures in the 1890s, the electric light and the phonograph were behind him, and the Wizard of Menlo Park had become an international celebrity.
Called the "Wizard of Menlo Park," Edison also invented the phonograph and the motion picture camera.
The phonograph became wildly popular, and Edison reached a new level of fame and was soon nicknamed "The Wizard of Menlo Park." Visitors from all over the world came to the lab to see the phonograph in action.