Withdrawal

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Withdrawal

A transaction in which a customer receives back money he/she had previously deposited at a bank, pension, or trust. When one makes a withdrawal on a pension or similar plan, it may carry a penalty depending on the pension's rules. For example, one must usually be of a certain age in order to make a withdrawal. There is rarely such a penalty when making a withdrawal from a bank. For instance, when one closes an account, the client makes a withdrawal on all the money he/she owns at that bank.

Withdrawal.

A withdrawal is money you take out of your banking, brokerage firm, or other accounts.

If you withdraw from tax-deferred retirement accounts before you turn 59 1/2, you may owe a 10% early withdrawal penalty plus any income tax that's due on the amount you've taken out.

In everyday usage, the term withdrawal is used interchangeably with distribution to describe money you take from your tax-deferred accounts, though distribution is actually the correct term.

References in periodicals archive ?
Institution of a protocol for assessing patients at risk for alcohol withdrawal syndrome and a standardized treatment protocol has demonstrated several advantages.
Clinical assessment and pharmacotherapy of the alcohol withdrawal syndrome. In: Galanter, M., ea., Recent Developments in Alcoholism, Vol.
(5.) Alcoholism, alcohol withdrawal syndrome. Kasper DJ, Jameson L, Hauser S.
Characterized by withdrawal syndrome, long-term use of opioid derivatives, such as morphine, results in major health problems like dependency.
Nicotine withdrawal versus other drug withdrawal syndromes: Similarities and dissimilarities.
The WAT-1 represents the closest valid and reliable scale for assessing the child with withdrawal syndrome. The items assessed resonate with the nurses caring for children with withdrawal syndrome.
Alcohol withdrawal syndrome occurs about 5-10 hours after the cessation of alcohol, and peaks in intensity in 2-3 days (Schuckit, 2008).
He was admitted for observation and treated with benzodiazepines and haloperidol, a neuroleptic, for presumed alcohol withdrawal syndrome. The next day, he had rhabdomyolysis, fever, and rigidity, and neuroleptic malignant syndrome was diagnosed.
It is pure escapism from the current doom and gloom and I'm already suffering from withdrawal syndrome. Come back Frank and the Jockey!
These results suggest the need to be aware of nicotine withdrawal syndrome in critically ill patients, and support the need for improved strategies to prevent agitation or treat it earlier".
Withdrawal symptoms (such as muscle tension, muscle cramps, and insomnia) were evaluated with the Short Opiate Withdrawal Syndrome scale, and pain was evaluated with the Huskisson's analogue scale for pain.