With-Profits Policy

(redirected from With-profits)
Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.
Related to With-profits: terminal bonus, With profits policy

With-Profits Policy

A chiefly British and Commonwealth term for a participating policy.
References in periodicals archive ?
Initial payments have been made to 37,379 With-Profits Annuitants (WPAs) or their estates, totalling GBP81m and subsequent annual payments totalling GBP183m have also been issued.
A Au10,000 with-profits bond purchased 10 years ago is now worth Au17,248, giving customers an impressive annual return of 5.6%.
It said a PS10,000 with-profits bond purchased 10 years ago is now worth PS17,082, while the same amount of money invested in a typical savings account would have grown to PS12,228.
Prudential claims an estimated pounds 22 billion has been added to the value of its with-profits fund since 2002; its fund is up 92.7% in 10 years, against a 59.5% rise in the FTSE All-Share index.
Worth pounds 26bn in its prime, it now has around 200,000 with-profits policyholders and a pounds 5.48bn with-profits fund.
Margaret Flaherty, with-profits communications manager at Standard Life, said; "After an encouraging start to the year for investment markets, we have seen sharp falls in equity values over the last couple of months.
A with-profits endowment policy into which someone had paid pounds 50 a month for 10 years would have been worth an average of pounds 6548 at the beginning of May, according to Money Management magazine.
Tens of billions are locked in with-profits bonds, which are supposedly super safe, because they are invested in shares, bonds, fixed interest investments, property and pensions funds.
Insurance giant Aviva is to pay a Au400 million windfall to its with-profits customers - but the amount is half what it had originally offered.
To address these issues, the FSA introduced a requirement for all firms operating with-profits funds to publish principles and practices of financial management (PPFMs).
With-profits investments are longterm savings policies that hold back some of the returns in good years to pay out in bad ones.