WS

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WS

The two-character ISO 3166 country code for SAMOA.

WS

1. See: Warrant.

2. ISO 3166-1 alpha-2 code for the Independent State of Samoa. This is the code used in international transactions to and from Samoan bank accounts.

3. ISO 3166-2 geocode for Samoa. This is used as an international standard for shipping to Samoa. Each Samoan district has its own code with the prefix "WS." For example, the code for the District of Atua is ISO 3166-2:WS-AT

WS

Used on the consolidated tape to indicate a warrant: G.WS 23.50.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Links between behavior and brain: Brain morphological correlates of language, face and auditory processing in Williams syndrome.
Fears, hyperacusis and musicality in Williams syndrome.
Cognitive, lexical and morpho-syntactic profiles of Israeli children with Williams Syndrome.
The researchers established that the changed response in people with Williams syndrome was not related to IQ.
Genetic approaches to cardiovascular disease--supravalvular aortic stenosis, Williams syndrome and Long QT syndrome.
Recently, Krinsky-Mchale, Kitter, Brown, Jenkins, Devenny (2005) also found evidence that Williams syndrome can be associated with precocious aging and loss of cognitive abilities.
For example, Down syndrome and depression or dementia, Williams syndrome and anxiety, Prader-Willi syndrome and emotional lability, fragile-X and attention deficit disorder.
This paper describes a longitudinal case study detailing the communication profile of one child with both Williams syndrome (WS) and autism.
Wolff, 1995) but people with Williams syndrome, despite having intellectual deficits, do not appear to have an empathy deficit (see e.
Key words: Williams syndrome, mental retardation, aortic valve stenosis, elastin, chromosome 7.
Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that the pattern of neuropsychological assets and deficits that characterizes NLD is evident in a wide variety of pediatric neurological diseases and disorders such as Asperger syndrome (Ellis & Gunter, 1999; Klin, Volkmar, Sparrow, Cicchetti, & Rourke, 1995), early shunted hydrocephalus (Fletcher, Brookshire, Bohan, Brandt, & Davidson, 1995), velocardiofacial syndrome (Fuerst, Dool, & Rourke, 1995), and Williams syndrome (Anderson & Rourke, 1995).