William Sharpe


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William Sharpe

An American economist and professor. His major contributions include both the capital asset pricing model and the Sharpe ratio, which attempts to account for a money manager's index-like tendencies in portfolio management. Sharpe won the Nobel Prize for economics in 1990. He was born in 1934.
References in classic literature ?
Later they may like to read the Century Edition of Macpherson's Ossian, edited by William Sharpe. Stories about Ossian will be found among the many books of Celtic tales now published.
This ratio, which was developed by Nobel laureate William Sharpe in 1966, is calculated by taking the excess return of an investment over the risk-free rate and dividing it by its standard deviation.
These tools are slightly improved versions of pioneering work in the 1950s and 1960s by Harry Markowitz (the efficient frontier), William Sharpe and others (the capital asset pricing model), and Myron Gordon (the dividend discount model for valuing a firm).
Nearly 30 years have passed since William Sharpe introduced returns-based style analysis (RBSA) to the investment world in his landmark article, "Determining a Fund's Effective Asset Mix." In 1992, RBSA became commercially available through Zephyr StyleAdvisor.
The other six nominees include incumbent directors Lisa Wardell (Board Chair), LuAnn Via (President and Chief Executive Officer), and William Sharpe, and new independent director candidates Jonathan Duskin, Kent Kleeberger, and Laura Weil.
Volumes of research critical of the practice have been written, and some of the greatest investment minds - William Sharpe, a Nobel laureate, Benjamin Graham, considered the father of value investing, and John Bogle, founder of The Vanguard Group--have all counseled against it.
Wenatchee Ave., Wenachee; Jona Corinne Sharpe and Donald William Sharpe applied for a license to serve bee and wine in the tavern.
So great were these changes, they prompted Nobel Laureate William Sharpe and colleagues to re-examine Bengen's hypothesis.
But in 2008, Nobel laureate William Sharpe (of Sharpe Ratio fame) released research that found the 4 percent rule wasn't always successful.
The editors of the Case Western Reserve law Review respectfully dedicate this issue to Professor Calvin William Sharpe.
William Sharpe invites us on a journey through time, technology and
Passive investing, on the other hand, is based on empirical evidence including Eugene Fama's Efficient Market Hypothesis and the Nobel Prizewinning work of William Sharpe. "Seventy per cent of active funds fail to do better than the average market return.