William S. Paley

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William S. Paley

An American businessman who brought CBS to prominence. He started in his family's cigar business, which purchased a number of radio stations in Philadelphia, primarily to advertise the cigars. Paley pioneered quality programming to draw advertisers. He served as owner and executive of CBS for most of his career. He lived from 1901 to 1990.
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William Paley was best known in the Australian colonies for his theological works--particularly his View of the evidences of Christianity (Paley 1794) and Natural Theology; or Evidences of the Existence and Attributes of the Deity (Paley 1802).
In any case, while Wesley was responding to the spiritual needs of thousands, his contemporary William Paley was addressing Enlightenment-prompted questions about "the historical reliability of New Testament miracles": "Paley argued on both the internal consistency of the New Testament and the corroboration of other contemporary accounts that the persecution of the apostles was historically genuine"; obviously, "the religion must be true.
The anchor of ABC's "This Week with Christiane Amanpour" joins the ranks of past award recipients including news anchors Diane Sawyer, Brian Williams and Tom Brokaw; newspaper publishers Katharine Graham, Al Neuharth and Otis Chandler; television executives William Paley, Frank Stanton and Ted Turner; and newspaper journalists Ben Bradlee, Helen Thomas and Bob Woodward.
THE WATCHMAKER ANALOGY MADE famous by William Paley the analogy is a teleological argument - an argument for the existence of God or a creator based on perceived evidence of order, intelligence, purpose, design, or direction.
This phrase is attributed to William Paley, a British Christian apologist and philosopher who was quoted in 1879 as saying, "Here is a principle which is a bar against all information, which is proof against all argument, and which cannot fail to keep a man in everlasting ignorance.
English clergyman William Paley (1743-1805) professed that if a person found a watch in an empty field, its Intricate design and practical purpose would lead that person to conclude that the watch had a watchmaker.
While broadcasting a weekly show on WJR in the late 1920s, Coughlin was heard by CBS owner William Paley.
William Paley, a contemporary of Darwin, used the analogy of the finding of a watch to illustrate purposeful design and construction.
Today some people cite the arguments of William Paley that the design exhibited in the living world proves the existence of an intelligent designer.
Chapter 2 ("Setting the Scene") explores the intellectual trends that prepared the way for Darwin's theoretical innovations, including very useful discussions of Robert Chambers, Jean-Baptiste Lamarck, and William Paley. Chapter 3 ("Darwin and His Bulldog") examines the structure of Darwin's evolutionary gambit, the philosophical ambitions of the first-generation "Darwinians," and the liberal Protestant willingness to see divine purpose in evolutionary progress.
This public-private partnership, which brought together community representatives and the era's most powerful CEOs, including CBS' William Paley, IBM's Thomas Watson, and Citibank's George Moore, was a revolutionary concept at the time.
Thus we have, for example, William Paley's argument that if one discovers a watch with all its integral parts and intricacies involved in the parts working in unison to correctly report the time, one should rightly and reasonably conclude that, while the parts separate from one another do not require an intelligent designer, the intrinsic order of the parts in a watch directing there to the telling of the time does require an intelligent designer to account for their unity of function in determining the time.