William S. Paley

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William S. Paley

An American businessman who brought CBS to prominence. He started in his family's cigar business, which purchased a number of radio stations in Philadelphia, primarily to advertise the cigars. Paley pioneered quality programming to draw advertisers. He served as owner and executive of CBS for most of his career. He lived from 1901 to 1990.
References in periodicals archive ?
William Paley, a contemporary of Darwin, used the analogy of the finding of a watch to illustrate purposeful design and construction.
Today some people cite the arguments of William Paley that the design exhibited in the living world proves the existence of an intelligent designer.
Chapter 2 ("Setting the Scene") explores the intellectual trends that prepared the way for Darwin's theoretical innovations, including very useful discussions of Robert Chambers, Jean-Baptiste Lamarck, and William Paley.
This public-private partnership, which brought together community representatives and the era's most powerful CEOs, including CBS' William Paley, IBM's Thomas Watson, and Citibank's George Moore, was a revolutionary concept at the time.
Important figures like John Ray, William Paley, and Philip Henry Gosse rise from history's dustbin and receive thoughtful portraits.
CBS head honcho William Paley (Frank Langella) backs Murrow in his crusade, aware that one false step could bring down the entire station.
CBS head honcho William Paley (Langella) backs Murrow in his crusade, aware that one false step could bring down the entire station.
In contrast, William Paley and Don Hollenbeck contribute directly to the film's dramatic weight.
HOUSE' PARTY: On the same day that learned their show had been picked up for a third season, the cast and creators of Fox's hit medical drama ``House'' - which executive producer/director Bryan Singer described as ``a hypochondriac's worst nightmare'' - gathered at the Directors Guild to discuss the series as part of the William Paley Television Festival sponsored by the Museum of Television and Radio.
That line was uttered by none other than Babe Paley, the icon of glamour, style and grace, whose (second) marriage to CBS founder William Paley put her at the pinnacle of New York (and even European) society from 1947 until her death in 1978.
CBS head honcho William Paley (Frank Langella) supports Murrow in his crusade, aware that one false step could bring down the entire station.
and entities controlled by National Kinney was the forerunner of the syndications of real estate, drawing many prominent investors such as the Trump family; Andre Meyer, a founder of Lazard Freres; the McGowan family of California; William Paley and others.