Beveridge Report

(redirected from William Beveridge)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Beveridge Report

A report to the British Cabinet recommending the creation of the modern Welfare State. The Beveridge Report cited five social evils in the United Kingdom: squalor, ignorance, want, idleness and disease. It recommended an expansion of the National Insurance program and the creation of what became the National Health Service. It was published in 1941 and most of its recommendations were adopted following the Labour Party victory in the 1945 election.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
32) Social Insurance and Allied Services: Report by Sir William Beveridge (London, 1942), pp.
William Beveridge versus Robin Hood: Social security and redistribution over the life cycle.
Particularmente, se adentra en la relacion que, segun William Beveridge (1) --considerado el "padre" de este modelo de Estado capitalista--, debia existir entre el desarrollo de un sistema de seguridad social, el empleo y la situacion de la propiedad sobre los medios de produccion (2).
Por su parte, William Beveridge, no solamente es considerado el "padre" del estado de bienestar britanico, sino que tambien resulta interesante en un contexto que fue marcado por el pensamiento de J.
O'Brien reflects the new Fabian socialism emerging in the 1940s, led by William Beveridge, who laid the foundation for Britain's National Social Insurance and National Health Service with The Report on Social Insurance, commonly known as the Beveridge Report.
British planners, led by William Beveridge, helped lay the intellectual framework for the massive expansion of the British welfare state that followed the Labor Party's triumph in the 1945 elections.
His words for some of his other colleagues, such as Harold Laski and William Beveridge, on the other hand, are contemptuous, and it is somewhat surprising to see them surface in print.
She said the architect of the Welfare State, Sir William Beveridge, would have added it to his list of giant evils - want, disease, squalor, ignorance and idleness - if he was starting today.
In it William Beveridge, a Liberal economist who briefly represented Berwick as an MP, identified five "Giant Evils" in society: squalor, ignorance, want, idleness, and disease, and went on to propose widespread reform to the system of social welfare to address these.
Ed Miliband summoned the ghost of 19th century Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli at his party conference in October, but the new man of the moment is William Beveridge, founder of the welfare state.
Seventy years ago on Saturday William Beveridge published his great wartime report that proposed abolishing welfare as we had known it.
PEGGY, Newcastle * WHEN, in the 1940s William Beveridge, envisaged a welfare state, was he thinking of a nation hooked on drugs and substance abuse?