Will

(redirected from Willer)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Will

A document stating how and to whom a person wants his/her property transferred after death. In addition to transferring property, a will may specify how certain responsibilities are to be performed. For example, a will may state who shall take care of the decedent's minor children, how they are to be educated, and so forth. A court must enforce the provisions of a will unless there is some overriding legal reason for it not to do so. Many advisers recommend writing a will to ensure that the writer's wishes are carried out.

Will.

A will is a legal document you use to transfer assets you have accumulated during your lifetime to the people and institutions you want to have them after your death.

The will also names an executor -- the person or people who will carry out your wishes.

You can leave your assets directly to your heirs, or you can use your will to establish one or more trusts to receive the assets and distribute them at some point in the future.

The danger of dying without a will is that a court in the state where you live will decide what happens to your assets. Its decision may not be what you would have chosen, and its deliberations can be costly and delay settling your estate.

will

An instrument by which a person directs the disposition of assets after death.At one time the term will referred to disposition of real property, and a testament was a disposition of personal property,hence the expression “last will and testament.”Today,will covers all properties. See also holographic will (handwritten), nuncupative will (oral), intestate succession (dying without a will), and escheat (dying with no will and no heirs).
References in periodicals archive ?
Lieutenant Colonel Monnin and Lieutenant Colonel Willer joins a speaker panel of high-level military and government representatives from nations with leading AMD programmes (including V4 countries Czech Republic, Poland, Hungary and Slovakia) as well as key solution providers developing next generation capability in this vital area of defence such as Lockheed Martin, Northrop Grumman, Rafael, and Weibel Scientific.
We explored the relationship in follow-up analyses and found that this association was not mediated by either political ideology or past levels of charitable giving," Willer said.
These regulations have good intentions behind them, but they've become overwhelming," Willer said.
Willer theorizes that accidents at this level of competition are caused primarily by players watching the puck instead of what is in front of them--of not playing "heads-up," which coaches try to instill at all levels.
Though similar in certain regards, ordering and inclusion are distinct; when found together their joint effect is greater than when either is found separately (Corra & Willer, 2002).
This is a good agreement in the current context, commented the Italian Environment Minister and acting President of the G8, Willer Bordon, since Trieste could have sounded the death knell for the climate change negotiations and the Kyoto Protocol.
Timothy Stamp, who had been living under the assumed name of Christopher Willer, was taken into custody at his mother's home in the 2700 block of Titania Place following a tip from the FBI.
Hoodenpyle's hunter was Martin Willer of Maple Plain, Minnesota.
individual service, individual program, or individual written rehabilitation plan), and ongoing monitoring of progress (Carling, 1992; Cook, Graham, & Razzano, 1993; Willer, Guastaferro, Zankiw, & Duran, 1992).
Matthew Willer will continue with the Company as the Vice President of Sales and Online Marketing to lead the online and e-commerce aspects of the business.
Marina Willer, a filmmaker and graphic designer, wants to tell the story of her family, one of 12 to survive the Nazi occupation of Prague, Czechoslovakia and escape to Brazil in her new project, Red Trees.
Robb Willer, an associate professor of sociology at Stanford University, explored the nature of gossip and ostracism in collaboration with co-authors Matthew Feinberg, a postdoctoral researcher at Stanford, and Michael Schultz from the University of California-Berkeley.