Wide-Angle Lens

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Wide-Angle Lens

A camera lens allowing one to take an image with a broader spectrum. That is, one may see more on either side of the focal point of the image. However, a wide angle lens may compress depth, potentially resulting in a blurred image. It is used in both photography and film.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Wide-angle lenses allow you to capture more of your subject in one shot.
Even though the point-and-shoot digital cameras that can accommodate wide-angle lenses are smaller than traditional SLR cameras, they are a bit bulky when you add the wide-angle lens attachment.
Longer focal lengths compress information, while wide-angle lenses can create a richly layered sense of depth.
Some fear wide-angle lenses because they seem to distort the subject in this manner, but I see no problem with such distortion-most viewers simply recognize it as a perceptual effect.
Since digital SLRs can rely on miniature electronic LCD viewfinders, perhaps the difficult problems of designing retro-focus wide-angle lenses that clear the mirror swing of SLR film cameras won't have to be overcome, and the nearly nonexistent selection of digital extreme wide-angle lenses will multiple.