WHOIS

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WHOIS

A query into a computer system seeking the identity of a domain name, IP address or other unknown information. The WHOIS query promotes security on computer systems.
References in periodicals archive ?
The scope and accessibility of WHOIS database information has been an issue of contention.
For example, the content of San Diego State University (SDSU) web page is more likely to be associated with the actual geolocation of SDSU server's IP address, which is registered as "5500 Campanile Drive, San Diego, California" in the WHOIS database. In addition, many points (web pages) overlap (with the same server IP addresses, or geolocation coordinates).
While the name and contact information for domain name registrants has traditionally been available through the WHOIS database, since 2002, some domain name registrars have been offering private or anonymous domain registration.
Register.com complained that Verio's scraping of its Whois database amounted to an unauthorized access under the CFAA because the Whois database's terms of use precluded the use of automated search programs and because Register.com specifically told Verio that it did not consent to the use of the automated tools.
Generally, the contact information (name, address, e-mail and phone number) provided by domain name registrants is available in a public whois database. For example, the whois database of Network Solutions, Inc.
At this point, the Kaltix site just says "Coming Soon." A search in the WhoIs database reveals links to a venture capital firm in Mountain View, Calif.
He also says that there should be a "judicial or legislative decision made" to show that NSI doesn't own the contents of the whois database, which NSI claims it does because it has spent six years building it up and maintaining it.
Even Thomson and Thomson offers its WHOIS database for verifying domain name owners at no charge.
Sources close to NSI say that real progress was being made last week up to the break following the agreement, and that the team of CEO Jim Rutt, SVP Don Telage, counsel Phil Sbarbaro, and other outside counsel will continue to push for the company's goals, prime among which is to hold on to some sort of perceived intellectual property rights over the whois database.
And rather than concentrate on the issues of registering domains that conflict with trademarks, NSI was once again the focus; this time over its IP claims over the contents of the whois database that contains all the information on the 5 million or so domains that are currently registered.
The company has also reinstated the date that registration records were first created on the whois database, which is useful information to competitive registrars and users that want particular names that may not be renewed.
The reasons for the move are numerous, but primary among them are: the consolidation of what was becoming a somewhat confusing marketing message from the company, which had at least three sites dedicated to domain name registration; the pre-emptive combination of its registry and registrar functionality ahead of forced competition in its registrar business; and the fact that according to those who know, internic.net's traffic would see it regularly listed in the top 10 most visited sites on the web because of the number of searches on its whois database. The market seemed to think that NSI may have overstepped the mark this time, as its recent sharp rise was ended with a late drop in its share price, closing down $43.25, or 15% at $244.75, despite a rise above $300 at the open.