White Collar Worker

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White Collar Worker

An office worker, especially an educated or respected one. White collar works include (but are not limited to) clerical employees, salespersons, retail managers, bankers and so forth. White collar workers are usually salaried (though many others work primarily on commission). White collar workers contrast with blue collar workers, who generally perform manual labor of some kind and/or have less education. Stereotypically, white collar workers earn more than blue collar workers, but this varies by job, industry and experience.
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Realisation of the need to organise white-collar workers professionals and managers in developed countries has increased in this decade.
He provides a few possible answers, one in particular that renders suspect the motivations of academics: in the current social hierarchy, in which white-collar workers are on top, the researchers, who are themselves the very white-collar workers they write about, benefit by maintaining the status quo.
A CEPD official expressed that there are 28,000 foreign white-collar workers working in Taiwan, a number which is fewer than other countries.
As expected, more Qataris (48%) attend Majlis than white-collar workers (18%).
But the recent global downturn led to company mergers, bankrupt firms and layoffs which have forced white-collar workers to make new plans about their lives, says Ilham Suheyl Akgul, head of a Turkish recruitment consultancy firm.
Thus, the resulting samples contain respectively 1,714 firms with 13,097 white-collar workers and 692 firms with 5,413 blue-collar workers.
It is rare for all of the automaker's new graduates to be assigned to factories as college graduates enter the company as white-collar workers or engineers.
Byline: It's blue-collar versus white-collar workers at various labour accommodation sites in Dubai at the weekend.
Ministers fear white-collar workers may steer clear of the sort of Jobcentre-based state help package to be unveiled shortly by the government.
Not really, contends Lawrence (trade and investment, Harvard U.), who argues much of the reported gap between real blue-collar wages and labor productivity growth is due to measurement issues and the rapid acquisition of skills by white-collar workers, while only some 30 percent is attributable to conventional wage inequality, the dramatic increase in wages of the richest Americans, and class inequality.
WHITE-COLLAR workers at a North-East council are to get their hands dirty this autumn.
Limited unionism among these new white-collar workers deserves close exploration.