White Collar Worker

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White Collar Worker

An office worker, especially an educated or respected one. White collar works include (but are not limited to) clerical employees, salespersons, retail managers, bankers and so forth. White collar workers are usually salaried (though many others work primarily on commission). White collar workers contrast with blue collar workers, who generally perform manual labor of some kind and/or have less education. Stereotypically, white collar workers earn more than blue collar workers, but this varies by job, industry and experience.
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It also made sense that since the whole purpose of work relief (in its 1930s guise) was the preservation of workers' morale and dignity, (25) the jobs assigned to white-collar workers would have to share what administrators saw as the most salient characteristics of their prior jobs--the work would have to be white collar.
Blue-collar workers are using more Limon Creole or Limon Creole/Spanish than white-collar workers. A t-test was done to find out if there is a difference between the language use pattern of both groups.
He presents a compelling argument for the idea that white-collar workers should want to reconstruct the attitudes society holds toward traditional laborers.
White-collar workers (56%) reported using social media more than Qataris (35%) and blue-collar respondents (35%).
It is also noteworthy that the labor cost elasticity of the firm-level labor demand is larger for blue-collar workers than for white-collar workers: measured by total hours, it is -0.65 for white collars and -2.31 for blue collars and measured by the number of workers, it is -0.51 for white collars and -2.31 for blue collars.
Not really, contends Lawrence (trade and investment, Harvard U.), who argues much of the reported gap between real blue-collar wages and labor productivity growth is due to measurement issues and the rapid acquisition of skills by white-collar workers, while only some 30 percent is attributable to conventional wage inequality, the dramatic increase in wages of the richest Americans, and class inequality.
WHITE-COLLAR workers at a North-East council are to get their hands dirty this autumn.
Limited unionism among these new white-collar workers deserves close exploration.
The BNA PLUS report provides representation and decertification election statistics by major union affiliation, industry, unit size, state and for white-collar workers. The report costs $95.
This compares to 58% of white-collar workers participating this year, up from 54% in 2003.
WASHINGTON -- Significantly fewer white-collar workers than blue-collar workers are smokers, according to National Health Interview Survey data from more than 140,000 respondents.
Of course, the metonymy also extends to the lives of and economic realities enmeshing the white-collar workers whose bodies Havel bids us imagine and thence to corporate hierarchies and all that they imply.