White Collar Crime

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White Collar Crime

A crime committed by an office worker within the context of his/her job, especially when the worker is educated or respected. For instance, a bank employee may divert pennies from customers' to his/her own account. White-collar criminals take advantage of their positions in the commission of their illegal acts. Ordinarily, white-collar crimes involve money; major examples include embezzlement, money laundering and some computer crimes. While white-collar crimes may appear victimless in their commission, they may have broader ramifications than street crimes such as burglary or theft. For example, a robber can only steal from one person or home at a time, while a white-collar criminal can embezzle funds from thousands or millions of investors.
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References in periodicals archive ?
By its nature, white-collar crime is non-physical, covert and immediate in impact (Edelhertz, 1970).
However, senior lawyers want to debate his approach to deal with cases of white-collar crime.
Earlier this week, we saw the Government publish their proposals on white-collar crime.
The training will explain investigative techniques for solving white-collar crimes, anti-money laundering, asset tracing techniques, digital forensic investigation, cyber-crimes and cyber security.
In this book, author Petter Gottschalk presents readers with a comprehensive examination of historic and contemporary white-collar crime, arguing that convenience is the main driver behind white-collar crime.
Conservative advocates of white-collar crime reform point to an entirely different galaxy of examples to prove their case.
Disdaining and evading OHS regulations and the consideration of deterrence in relation to prevention and response to corporate crimes and safety crimes were studied historically and termed as 'criminaloid' by Ross (1907); 'white-collar crime' by Sutherland (1940, 1944), Chambliss (1967), and Edelhertz (1970); 'organisational crime' by Schrager and Short (1978); 'corporate crime' by Clinard and Yeager (1980); 'organisational deviance' by Ermann and Lundman (1981); 'upper-world crime' by Geis (1982); and in recent times 'occupational crime' by Green (1997); and 'elite deviance' by Simon (2006).
Tolman said consumer, environmental and white-collar crime issues top his agenda.
He also handled several high profile white-collar crime cases, and he assisted the government in its case against Swiss bank Wagelin & Co., which was accused of helping wealthy Americans avoid paying taxes.
In this text for students in criminal justice, authors Di Marino (Kaplan University) and Roberson (Washburn University) describe different types of white-collar crime, such as banking and currency related crimes, and racketeering and organized crime.
The concept of deviant behavior propounded as White-Collar crime is not new.