White Collar Crime

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White Collar Crime

A crime committed by an office worker within the context of his/her job, especially when the worker is educated or respected. For instance, a bank employee may divert pennies from customers' to his/her own account. White-collar criminals take advantage of their positions in the commission of their illegal acts. Ordinarily, white-collar crimes involve money; major examples include embezzlement, money laundering and some computer crimes. While white-collar crimes may appear victimless in their commission, they may have broader ramifications than street crimes such as burglary or theft. For example, a robber can only steal from one person or home at a time, while a white-collar criminal can embezzle funds from thousands or millions of investors.
References in periodicals archive ?
The FIA officer will be joined by a representative of NAB, a nominee of the Security and Exchange Commission of Pakistan familiar with money laundering and white-collar crimes, a nominee of the State Bank of Pakistan, a seasoned Inter-Services Intelligence officer nominated by its director general, and a Military Intelligence officer nominated by its director general.
LAHORE -- Lahore Garrison University's recently established Digital Forensic Research and Service Centre (DFRSC) Monday initiated a special training course of 'Certified white-collar crime investigator' for National Accountability Bureau (NAB) officials.
The authors of this theory asserts that crimes including White-Collar crimes, require no motivation, or pressure that is not present in any other form of criminal behavior.
3]: Law enforcement believes specific white-collar crimes facilitated by the Internet is growing (e.
Jewell's attorney, Sam Perroni of North Little Rock, is using the case as part of the course on white-collar crime he is teaching at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock William H.
Any time money and power intersect without appropriate checks and balances, you'll have the potential for problems," says Warren Baker, senior partner at the Chicago law Firm Gardner, Carton & Douglas, and an attorney who has prosecuted a handful of such white-collar crime cases over the years.
One of the problems with complicated white-collar crimes like offshore insurance schemes is that they are difficult to explain and difficult for some to see as real crimes.
This means that less than eight percent of white-collar crimes reached the proper authorities, according to the National Public Survey on White Collar Crime, a groundbreaking survey conducted by the National White Collar Crime Center (NW3C), a nonprofit, Federally funded organization that supports state and local police in their efforts to prevent, investigate, and prosecute economic and high-tech crime.
FRAUD AND WHITE-COLLAR CRIMES are typically committed by older, better-educated offenders.
The authors make evident that white-collar crimes are a substantially greater hazard to the public than street crimes.
Second, let's consider that white-collar crimes are committed mostly by whites from the middle and upper classes and not by the poor and working classes, which contain a high percentage of black single-female-headed households.
The author, a 17-year veteran with the Austin, Texas, Police Department, presents information in an easy-to-follow manner on a subject of increasing importance to law enforcement as agencies devote more resources to investigating white-collar crimes.