White Collar Crime

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White Collar Crime

A crime committed by an office worker within the context of his/her job, especially when the worker is educated or respected. For instance, a bank employee may divert pennies from customers' to his/her own account. White-collar criminals take advantage of their positions in the commission of their illegal acts. Ordinarily, white-collar crimes involve money; major examples include embezzlement, money laundering and some computer crimes. While white-collar crimes may appear victimless in their commission, they may have broader ramifications than street crimes such as burglary or theft. For example, a robber can only steal from one person or home at a time, while a white-collar criminal can embezzle funds from thousands or millions of investors.
References in periodicals archive ?
John's University in New York and author and co-author of several books on white-collar crime, describes how regulators and law-enforcement organizations are ill-equipped to fight this complex and sophisticated type of crime.
White-collar crimes come in many different forms, including money laundering; credit card, health care, insurance, securities, and/or telecommunications fraud; intellectual property and computer crimes; and identity theft.
Conversely, fraud and white-collar crimes are typically committed by older, better-educated offenders.
The Mythology of Crime and Criminal Justice indicates that the excessive concern by American society with street crimes overlooks more serious social problems (such as white-collar crimes, teenage runaways, and children abused at the hands of their relatives.
The chapter on investigative reports and case preparation provides a strong foundation for investigators who are untrained in documenting white-collar crimes.
In a 1982 study, the Wheeler group tested the fairness of justice and found that there was a significant positive relationship between socioeconomic status and the probability of imprisonment for white-collar crimes.
White-collar crime is also responsible for a significant loss in productivity that is not reflected in the statistics.
As a result, white-collar crime investigators can use today's application software to do more than write reports and present evidence.
Department of Justice's Tax Division where he prosecuted criminal tax, money laundering and related white-collar crimes.
After eight years heading the Los Angeles headquarters office's specialized financial institution fraud unit - which oversees mostly white-collar crimes in seven counties - Nesbitt said he looks forward to overseeing an office that typically deals with a broader spectrum of federal violations.
The aging of the population coupled with the fact that an increasing number of women commit frauds led criminologist Georgette Bennett to observe that white-collar crimes will increase as the proportion of older people in the population grows.