White Collar Crime


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White Collar Crime

A crime committed by an office worker within the context of his/her job, especially when the worker is educated or respected. For instance, a bank employee may divert pennies from customers' to his/her own account. White-collar criminals take advantage of their positions in the commission of their illegal acts. Ordinarily, white-collar crimes involve money; major examples include embezzlement, money laundering and some computer crimes. While white-collar crimes may appear victimless in their commission, they may have broader ramifications than street crimes such as burglary or theft. For example, a robber can only steal from one person or home at a time, while a white-collar criminal can embezzle funds from thousands or millions of investors.
References in periodicals archive ?
Department of Justice's Public Integrity Section of the Criminal Division, where he investigated and prosecuted white collar crime on a national level.
Chairing a fortnightly meeting to review the performance of NAB's operation, prosecution and all regional bureaus at NAB Headquarters, Chairman NAB said that NAB is the only organization which has prescribed a maximum time limit of 10 months for expeditious disposal of mega corruption white collar crime cases which is a challenging task but we are committed to beat the clock by putting hard work and ensuring corruption free Pakistan as per law.
In a textbook on white collar crime at the federal level, O'Sullivan balances substantive and procedural criminal law in the study of US statutes under which white-collar defendants may be prosecuted.
Justice Saqib and his team also resorted to use of JITs in solving complicated cases of white collar crimes.
"We are making a film on a white collar crime based on the software industry that is inspired by true events.
He said: "I attach the highest priority to the full investigation of white collar crime and bringing the perpetrators of such crime to justice.
Although she said she didn't think she was related to the person, the attorney general said white collar crime has been occurring for many years.
This finding is consistent with white-collar crime statistics reported by the National White Collar Crime Center's October 2009 "IC3 2009 Internet Crime Report," which showed that 42% of those arrested for white-collar crimes in 2007 were women.) To some extent, this finding may be driven by the "glass ceiling" effect, whereby men tend to occupy higher positions in organizations than their female contemporaries (Joseph T.
"White collar crime," a term coined by sociologist Edwin
NEW laws to tackle white collar crime passed all stages in the Dail yesterday.
Don Brackman, director of the National White Collar Crime Center, believes, "in a technology-driven global market, the inability of consumers to distinguish between legitimate and fraudulent activities poses a serious threat to our economy" (National White Collar Crime Center, 2010, p.