White Collar Worker


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Related to White Collar Worker: Desk job

White Collar Worker

An office worker, especially an educated or respected one. White collar works include (but are not limited to) clerical employees, salespersons, retail managers, bankers and so forth. White collar workers are usually salaried (though many others work primarily on commission). White collar workers contrast with blue collar workers, who generally perform manual labor of some kind and/or have less education. Stereotypically, white collar workers earn more than blue collar workers, but this varies by job, industry and experience.
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Every year many white collar workers fall from bunk beds and suffer from lacerations, sprains and fractures.
In light of the new evidence researchers feel public health warnings are failing to resonate with white collar workers and have instead "actively reinforced their view that their own alcohol use was problem-free".
6, 1932) (on file with FDR Library, HH 7, Plans and Suggestions for Relief 1932) ("Among projects employing white collar workers were clearing of public records, necessary clerical work which the unemployed perform in the relief bureaus and other welfare agencies, and traffic and topographical studies valuable to the local districts.
However, the result is only true for white collar workers.
White collar workers may find their e-mail monitored; data entry workers may have their key strokes counted; anyone can have his or her purse or backpack searched at any time.
Secondly, the white collar workers are clearly the individuals with the highest status in the Limon Creole community.
Forget Armani, as costumers are more likely to suit their TV attorneys, stock brokers and white collar workers in traditional career brands such as Jones New York, Anne Klein, Donna Karan, Tahari and Ellen Tracy.
IRELAND's young white collar workers are quitting the civil service for better paid jobs in the private sector.
industrial and white collar workers are now working the longest hours of their lives.
Children of farmers or blue collar workers had twice the infection risk of children of white collar workers, an observation that supports observations that poverty increases infection risk.
Glazed walls enclosing the garden courtyard bring different departments into visual contact with each other, and both blue and white collar workers share a communal canteen.
Layoffs were rampant among blue and white collar workers, and there seemed little hope of an improvement in the immediate future for job opportunities.