White Collar Worker


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Related to White Collar Worker: Desk job

White Collar Worker

An office worker, especially an educated or respected one. White collar works include (but are not limited to) clerical employees, salespersons, retail managers, bankers and so forth. White collar workers are usually salaried (though many others work primarily on commission). White collar workers contrast with blue collar workers, who generally perform manual labor of some kind and/or have less education. Stereotypically, white collar workers earn more than blue collar workers, but this varies by job, industry and experience.
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"Every year many white collar workers fall from bunk beds and suffer from lacerations, sprains and fractures.
In light of the new evidence researchers feel public health warnings are failing to resonate with white collar workers and have instead "actively reinforced their view that their own alcohol use was problem-free".
It drew upon the history of social workers in the twentieth century, exploring the subjectivity of one group of professional, white collar workers as that class fraction emerged in relation to the social history of work, labor and ideology.
Around 750 white collar workers and 400 production staff will lose their jobs at the Browns Lane site in Coventry.
It speaks to blue collar workers, white collar workers, seniors, teenagers, boys, girls.
Its about time the managers stopped employing white collar workers and gave the money to the people who actually matter.
White collar workers and those based in the West Midlands were most likely to go the office when they were ill, research found.
Finnish pharmaceuticals retail and marketing company Schering Oy, part of the German pharmaceuticals company Schering Group AG, said on Monday (24 November) that it had concluded its personnel negotiations, and as a result would reduce its personnel by 111 employees, mainly white collar workers.
Workers at the installation in Cumbria, run by British Nuclear Fuels (BNFL), voted overwhelmingly on Monday for industrial action over a long-running grievance relating to pay differentials between blue and white collar workers.
(10) For an important theoretical and historical account of the battles fought by white-collar workers during this period, see JURGEN KOCKA, WHITE COLLAR WORKERS IN AMERICA, 1890-1940: A SOCIAL-POLITICAL HISTORY IN INTERNATIONAL PERSPECTIVE (1980).
This may explain why Osaka white collar workers' average outlay for lunch was [yen] 730, compared to a tightfisted [yen] 680 for Tokyo.
However, the result is only true for white collar workers. Blue collar workers do not have a strong relationship between experience in the labor market and the wage premium paid by large firms.