Wharfage


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Wharfage

A fee that a ship's owner or operator must pay in order to have the right to use a wharf, which is a place where ships dock to load or unload cargo.
References in periodicals archive ?
Campaign leaders failed to understand that a meeting that considered the child labor bylaw along with the press and wharfage bylaws created a conundrum for all.
A project such as Wharfage paints a picture of a region--its issues and relationships--drastically different from the image typically generated by the mainstream media.
as they were from charges for wharfage or towage, or any other local port charges for services rendered to vessels or cargoes.
By 1855 the trade in stone, lime, and limestone provided almost one-quarter of the canal's toll income and occupied approximately half the company's wharfage space in Manchester.
import tariffs or fees, wharfage charges, and demurrage).
Wharfage charges for 20ft and 40ft containers have now been set at $50 and $75 respectively.
Port charges include: transit passage fee, wharfage, agency fee, pilot dues and other different types of fees and charges (garbage collection charge, water and light dues etc).
The property is set eight feet above road level on The Wharfage, Ironbridge's main riverside roadway.
Funding for CAAP has been provided by POLB and the POLA, which derives all its revenue from fees for shipping services such as dockage, wharfage, piloting, storage, property rentals and royalties.
1-2, two urgent task orders were placed against a contract with the North Carolina State Port Authority for port operation services that included dockage, wharfage and trash disposal in Morehead City, N.
The HI DOT relies on wharfage fees as its source of information on cargo flows, and like the COE, asks the carriers to convert data to short tons.
That business, South Wales Wharfage, came to an abrupt end when the Second Severn Crossing was built through the very wharves which he used to import coal.