Wares

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Wares

An informal word for goods for sale.
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globalized controlling networks, which The Diamond Age refreshes by pushing these wetware webs into the domain of socialist and cognitive fields.
Rucker's Wetware offers perhaps the most relentless ridicule of the Chandleresque, systematically satirizing all the basic elements of the hardboiled detective formula.
But you really don't need much more than a phone, he says, because "the most important piece of hardware is your wetware.
Meme theory thus smacks gratifyingly of director Ridley Scott or novelist William Gibson, of the fashionably gloomy sci-fi depictions of wetware mergers of human and machine, or the neo-religiosity of Neal Stephenson's cult bestseller Snow Crash, with its sly conflation of the categories of virus, drug, language, program, and religion--all now understood as different ways of describing the same meme invasion, the same alteration of post-Babel consciousness.
An LSD-inspired Beatles song was all that parsed in my own `sixties-vintage wetware, until the penny dropped.
The soulful, asynchratic warmbloods of the Tropics and Southern Hemisphere are people whose crania contain wetware as potentially capable of massive information processing as our own.
Is it a new form of conflict that owes its existence to the burgeoning global information infrastructure, or an old one whose origin lies in the wetware of the human brain but has been given new life by the information age?
The user, affectionately known as wetware, interacts with online services through reading and typing, and by using menus and a mouse to send directions.
In all, more than a dozen GE Healthcare hardware, software, and wetware products and services specific to Grace's personalized treatment path will be on display.
One of the arguments put forwards by proponents of the technological singularity is that silicon has a significant speed advantage over our brain's wetware, and this advantage doubles every two years or so according to Moore's law.