Wellness Program

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Wellness Program

Any program that promotes health, especially for employees of a company. A wellness program may offer seminars on quitting smoking, free access to a gym, and any number of other benefits. Wellness program are aimed to improve employee health, which in turn can improve morale and increase productivity.
References in periodicals archive ?
Wellness programs also routinely require employees to get annual checkups.
It's true that wellness programs are most common in large corporations, but small companies also can offer these benefits and reap the advantages.
Workers are starting to connect in an intensely personal way with employer-sponsored wellness programs.
Some employers and health insurance plans offer incentives, financial and otherwise to employees who participate in wellness programs or achieve certain health outcomes.
Summary: Increasingly, more employers are offering workplace wellness programs to promote and encourage healthier lifestyles for their employees and to prevent disease.
Chamber of Commerce Senior Vice President of Labor, Immigration, and Employee Benefits Randy Johnson issued the following statement today on the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission's final rules relating to workplace wellness programs:
Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) issued final rules on employer-sponsored wellness programs in May.
Russellville, AR, January 22, 2016 --(PR.com)-- Arkansas Tech University will use the Corporate Health & Wellness Association's (CHWA) publication, Engaging Wellness: Corporate Wellness Programs that Work as a required text for their students of the Health and Physical Education Department's Wellness Degree.
Wellness programs were not as common in HDHPs as in CDHPs, the survey found.
The core practices of wellness programs typically include: (1) strategic planning to prevent disease, decrease health risks, and contain rising health care costs; (2) conducting health screenings of individuals and risk stratification of the entire employee population; (3) providing risk-related health management interventions (exercise, behavior change programs, health coaching, educational materials, nurse advice lines, and referral to disease management specialty programs); and (4) ongoing evaluation and metrics.
In recent years, many employers have gotten on board with wellness programs to mitigate that cost and to bolster employee morale, concentration and overall health--but how well do these programs actually work?
If you provide incentives to encourage employees to participate in wellness programs, such as discounting the cost of the medical insurance coverage for being tobacco-free, changes may soon be necessary as a result of the US Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) proposed rules that were issued on April 20, 2015.