welfare state

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Related to Welfare theory: Welfare economics

Welfare State

The concept in which a government is or views itself as responsible for providing some minimum economic security for citizens. For example, the government may guarantee housing, work and a minimum income for all citizens. Less comprehensively, a government may provide income during periods of unemployment or poverty. Most governments have a welfare state to some degree. Proponents view welfare states as a form of economic justice. Critics contend that they are detrimental to GDP growth and promote needless dependency.

welfare state

a country that provides comprehensive SOCIAL-SECURITY BENEFITS such as state health services, state retirement pensions, unemployment and sickness benefits, etc. See TRANSFER PAYMENTS, GOVERNMENT EXPENDITURE.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hicksian welfare theory is static in nature, but decisions in reality are often dynamic.
Roth, The Present State of Consumer Theory: The Implications for Social Welfare Theory (Lanham, Md.
Robbins criticized the material welfare aspect of Pigou's work for the interpersonal welfare judgments that it required, and argued that welfare theory must pull out policy precepts from theory without the introspection inherent in the material welfare approach.
Family background is considered a determinant of welfare receipt by the culture of welfare theory.
By implication, the same conclusion applies to the consequentialist social welfare theory.
While this is not the standard welfare theory concern, examining data on product quality is useful in judging the ability of markets to handle asymmetric information in emergencies.
Regulatory policies animated by consequentialist social welfare theory are encumbered by two brute facts.
While most previous accounts of social policy or welfare theory, as it is also known, are organized around major theoretical schools of thought, and examine the implications of these schools of thought for social policy, these two book approach the subject from the perspective of key concepts.
Utilitarian social welfare theory (SWT), the genesis of the efficiency standard, contemplates theoretical constructs that cannot meaningfully be defined.
Jeremy Shearmur would like to see a more powerful theory of welfare in order to do justice to Mises's and Hayek's arguments for markets, but it remains unclear what kind of welfare theory he exactly has in mind.
Sherraden then describes his asset-based welfare theory and the policy mechanisms that would support it.
Maffeo Pantaleoni had published his Principii di Economia Pura (1889), which succeeded in clarifying and popularising the marginalist approach to economics in many parts of Italy, and Vilfredo Pareto and Enrico Barone had written several seminal pieces in the Giornale degli Economisti on equilibrium and welfare theory in the mid- to late-1890s.