welfare state

(redirected from Welfare states)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

Welfare State

The concept in which a government is or views itself as responsible for providing some minimum economic security for citizens. For example, the government may guarantee housing, work and a minimum income for all citizens. Less comprehensively, a government may provide income during periods of unemployment or poverty. Most governments have a welfare state to some degree. Proponents view welfare states as a form of economic justice. Critics contend that they are detrimental to GDP growth and promote needless dependency.

welfare state

a country that provides comprehensive SOCIAL-SECURITY BENEFITS such as state health services, state retirement pensions, unemployment and sickness benefits, etc. See TRANSFER PAYMENTS, GOVERNMENT EXPENDITURE.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Peronist welfare state enshrined many ideas that originated with the activism of female philanthropists and feminists.
Christian Democratic welfare states, in his account, tend to be "transfer-rich" but "service poor.
Perhaps Pimpare's most important conclusion for present-day policy is that a welfare state is the best political economy available for addressing the needs of the poor (6).
Recent reforms in the areas of income protection and activation in European welfare states show some common, by and large organizational characteristics (cf.
He dissociates himself from this view and broadens the definition to include the relationship between the welfare state and democracy and the relationship between these two and equality.
In spite of its superb intellectual attributes and valuable contribution in linking rich and poor welfare states, this book has very limited usefulness for the vast majority of general readers.
The Australian welfare regime incorporates elements from both social democratic and liberal welfare states, such as the role of large, centralized unions in securing a relatively high minimum wage, which social democratic welfare states frequently adopt, and the means-tested income support system that liberal welfare states prefer (Beer & Forster, 2002).
But if political mechanisms imply that big welfare states survive because they are beneficial for the middle class, what stops the middle class from using its political influence to demand further adjustments to the welfare state, resulting in systems that benefit it disproportionately?
In Chapters 6 and 7, Castles investigates the suggestion that welfare states are in crisis because of low fertility and an ageing population.
The outcome would have been the same as for the other goals: We know from the work of Barbara Hobson, Diane Sainsbury, and others on Luxembourg Income Study (LIS) data that the social democratic welfare states would come out on top as the most gender egalitarian.
The nine chapters offer an evolutionary analysis of selected welfare states worldwide.
While the impact of neo-liberalism, and of liberalism more generally, on welfare states has been much studied, States, Markets, Families extends existing analyses by examining the influence of liberal ideology on social policy regimes in the context of gender.